St. Olaf News

 

Nursing students present research at national conference

St. Olaf College students (from left) Kristina Haugen '13, Juliette Gibes '14, Claire Petchler '14, Haiyun Tang '13, and Caitlin Owsley '14 (along with Sijia Wei '14 and Mandy Sirek '13, who are not pictured) recently presented their research at the National Student Nurses Association Annual Convention.

St. Olaf College students (from left) Kristina Haugen ’13, Juliette Gibes ’14, Claire Petchler ’14, Haiyun Tang ’13, and Caitlin Owsley ’14 (along with Sijia Wei ’14 and Mandy Sirek ’13, who are not pictured) recently presented their research at the National Student Nurses Association Annual Convention.

A group of St. Olaf College nursing students recently presented their research at the National Student Nurses Association Annual Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina.

The students received funding to attend the convention from the St. Olaf Collaborative Undergraduate Research and Inquiry (CURI) program, which aims to provide opportunities for students of all academic disciplines to work closely with a faculty member in a research setting.

Sijia Wei ’14 presented research titled “The Influences of Globalization and Industrialization on the Emergence of Non-Communicable Diseases: A Look at China and the U.S.” Her project demonstrated the significant influence of globalization on the emergence of chronic diseases in developing countries and why developed countries need to play a role in controlling the epidemic.

Caitlin Owsley ’14 based her presentation, titled “Losing the Mind: An Analysis of Caregiver Burden with Alzheimer’s Disease,” on a research paper she wrote illustrating the responsibilities surrounding an Alzheimer’s diagnosis and the legislative initiatives aimed at easing those burdens.

Mandy Sirek ’13 focused on the increasing prevalence of diabetes diagnoses, specifically within immigrant populations. She examined the social determinants of health and their relationship to diabetes, and the potential need to modify the structural factors of society to address these issues.

Kristina Haugen ’13 presented her research on obstructive sleep apnea, a medical condition that is underdiagnosed, especially in women and people of color. Haugen modeled her project on the goals of the government-supported Healthy People 2020 initiative.

Juliette Gibes ’14 examined the sleep disorders associated with shift work in her presentation, titled “Catch 22: Does Shift Work Really Pay Off?” Her research focused on the impact that abnormal work hours have on people in a wide range of professions, including medical personnel, maritime workers, members of the police force, and truck drivers.

Haiyun Tang ’13 presented research focused on therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac arrest and brain injury survivors.

Claire Petchler ’14 says the experience of attending the convention furthered her own career aspirations. “I left the conference as a more curious and inspired student,” she says. “It was an invaluable part of my nursing education. It opened up my eyes to the huge variety of nursing careers and the opportunities nurses have to further the profession and help other people in all communities.”