Grant Opportunities in the Humanities

It’s best to contact St. Olaf staff in the Office of Government, Foundation, and Corporate Relations before contacting funders.

 

FunderAmountDue DateDescriptionKeywords
ACLS Digital Extension Grants$150,000 FebruaryThis program supports digitally based research projects in all disciplines of the humanities and related social sciences. It is hoped that these grants will help advance the digital transformation of humanities scholarship by extending the reach of existing digital projects to new communities of users.

ACLS Digital Extension Grants will support teams of scholars as they enhance existing digital projects in ways that engage new audiences across a range of academic communities and institutions. To this end, projects supported by these grants may:

Extend existing digital projects and resources with content that adds diversity or interdisciplinary reach;
Develop new systems of making existing digital resources available to broader audiences and/or scholars from diverse institutions;
Foster new team-based work or collaborations that allow scholars from institutions with limited cyberinfrastructure to exploit digital resources
Create new forms and sites for scholarly engagement with the digital humanities. Projects that document and recognize participant engagement are strongly encouraged.
ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowships$60,000 SeptemberACLS Collaborative Research Fellowships for collaborative research in the humanities and related social sciences. Objectives

The aim of this fellowship program is to offer small teams of two or more scholars the opportunity to collaborate intensively on a single, substantive project. The fellowship supports projects that produce a tangible research product (such as joint print or web publications) for which two or more collaborators will take credit.

The fellowships are for a total period of up to 24 months, to be initiated between July 1, 2016 and September 1, 2018, and provide up to $60,000 in salary replacement for each collaborator as well as up to $20,000 in collaboration funds (which may be used for such purposes as travel, materials, or research assistance). The amount of the ACLS fellowship for any collaborative project will vary depending on the number of collaborators and the duration of the research leave, but will not exceed $200,000 for any one project. Collaborations need not be interdisciplinary or inter-institutional. Applicants at the same institution, however, must demonstrate why local funding is insufficient to support the project. Collaborations that involve the participation of assistant and associate faculty members are particularly encouraged.
ACLS Fellowships$35,000-$70,000SeptemberThe ultimate goal of the project should be a major piece of scholarly work by the applicant. ACLS does not fund creative work (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translation, or pedagogical projects.

The ACLS Fellowships are intended as salary replacement to help scholars devote six to twelve continuous months to full-time research and writing. ACLS Fellowships are portable and are tenable at the fellow's home institution, abroad, or at another appropriate site for research. (1) An ACLS Fellowship may be held concurrently with other fellowships and grants and any sabbatical pay, up to an amount equal to the candidate's current academic year salary.
Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Program in China Studiesup to $50,000NovemberThe Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Program in China Studies seeks to maintain the vitality of China Studies in North America through fellowships and grants designed primarily for scholars early in their careers. Studies on and in China have developed over the last 30 years in the United States and Canada into a robust field, but current conditions pose daunting problems, especially for scholars just before and just after the dissertation. To address this situation, the program offers three competitions:

Predissertation-Summer Travel Grants, for graduate students who wish to conduct preliminary preparations in China prior to beginning basic research for the dissertation. They are not intended as extensions of the time devoted to basic research but to support the necessary steps to prepare for it. The grants are for graduate students—with a PhD prospectus in hand or developing one—to investigate the research currently underway in Chinese archives and field sites, to establish contact with Chinese scholars, and to secure necessary permissions for their own fieldwork or archival research;

Postdoctoral Fellowships, for scholars who are preparing or augmenting their PhD dissertation research for publication, or who are embarking on new research projects;

Collaborative Reading-Workshop Grants, for scholars of different disciplines to investigate texts that constitute essential points of entry to Chinese periods, traditions, communities, or events in contemporary or historical times.
African Humanities ProgramvariesNovemberThe African Humanities Program (AHP) seeks to reinvigorate the humanities in Africa through fellowship competitions and related activities in Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. In partnership with the Carnegie Corporation of New York, which has generously provided funding, AHP offers African scholars an integrated set of opportunities to develop individual capacities and to promote formation of scholarly networks. The African Humanities Program supports the Carnegie Corporation’s efforts to develop and retain African academics at universities in Africa.
Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars$75,000 SeptemberThese fellowships support long-term, unusually ambitious projects in the humanities and related social sciences. The ultimate goal of the project should be a major piece of scholarly work by the applicant. ACLS does not fund creative work (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translation, or pedagogical projects.
The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Program in Buddhist StudiesvariesNovemberACLS offers an articulated set of fellowship and grant competitions that will expand the understanding and interpretation of Buddhist thought in scholarship and society, strengthen international networks of Buddhist studies, and increase the visibility of innovative currents in those studies.

Beginning in 2015-16, the Foundation offers two new competitions to support research and teaching. Research fellowships support scholars with a PhD. Applications are welcome from scholars at any stage of their career, from any location in the world.

The competition for new professorships offers seed funding for teaching positions in Buddhist studies. Applications are invited from any institution of higher education and research at any location around the world.

The 2015-16 Research Fellowships and New Professorships in Buddhist Studies compliment the other program components of the Program in Buddhist Studies, strengthening this comprehensive initiative to develop the finest work by scholars in the field.
Berlin Prize Fellowships$5,000/monthMayThe American Academy offers residential fellowships to emerging as well as established scholars, writers, and professionals who wish to engage in independent study in Berlin. Around two dozen Berlin Prizes are conferred annually. Past Berlin Prize recipients have included historians, economists, poets, art historians, journalists, legal scholars, anthropologists, musicologists, public policy experts, and writers, among others. The Academy does not accept project proposals in mathematics and the hard sciences.

In addition to placing a high priority on the independent work of its fellows, the Academy is in a unique position to aid fellows in establishing professional and general networks both in Berlin and beyond. The Academy’s public outreach, which facilitates the introduction of a fellow's work to a wider audience, serves its mission of fostering transatlantic ties through cultural exchange.

Fellowships are typically awarded for an academic semester or, in some cases, for an entire academic year. Only the Bosch Fellowships in Public Policy may be for shorter stays of six to eight weeks. Fellowship benefits include round-trip airfare, housing at the Academy, partial board, and a stipend of $5,000 per month. The Academy’s furnished apartments at the Hans Arnhold Center are suitable for individuals and couples; accommodations are available for families with children at the Hans Arnhold Center or at nearby apartments. All fellows are expected to reside at the Hans Arnhold Center during the entire term of the award.

Fellowships are restricted to candidates based permanently in the US. US citizenship is not required, and American expatriates are not eligible. Candidates in academic disciplines are expected to have completed a doctorate at the time of application. Applicants working in most other fields – such as journalism, law, filmmaking, or public policy – must have equivalent professional degrees. Writers must have published at least one book at the time of application. Although it is helpful to explain how a Berlin residency would contribute to further professional development, candidates need not be working on German topics.
American Academy of Arts and Sciences Visiting Scholars Programup to $60,000October The Academy's Visiting Scholars Program provides residential fellowships for junior faculty members and postdoctoral scholars in the humanities and social sciences. The fellowship program offers scholars a year for research and writing free from teaching and administrative duties, a collaborative work environment, and the opportunity to interact with Academy members. It also creates a national network for these scholars, assisting them in their research and professional development.

The Academy seeks proposals in the humanities and social sciences relating to American history, culture, and public policy from the founding period to the present.
American Philosophical Society Fellowships and GrantsvariesvariesIn 2014-2015 the Society awarded over $1.1 million to nearly 200 scholars, and we expect to continue this level of support in 2015–2016. We maintain eight grant or fellowship programs in a wide range of fields. Our Franklin, Lewis and Clark, Lewis and Clark Astrobiology, Library Fellowship, and Phillips programs award small grants ($1,000 to $6,000) for modest research purposes. Our Daland and Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellowship programs award much larger amounts ($40,000 to $60,000) in highly selective competitions.

Awards are made for noncommercial research only. The Society makes no grants for academic study or classroom presentation, for travel to conferences, for non-scholarly projects, for assistance with translation, or for the preparation of materials for use by students. The Society does not pay overhead or indirect costs to any institution or costs of publication, and grant funds are not to be used to pay income tax on the award. The American Philosophical Society is pleased to introduce two new fellowship programs, offered through our Library. Please follow the links for access to further information and application instructions

American Philosophical Society Library Long-Term Pre-Doctoral Fellowships
One-year resident fellowships to assist in the completion of doctoral dissertation research. One fellowship is offered in each of three areas of study:
• Native American and Indigenous Research
• Early American History (to 1840)
• History of Science, Technology and Medicine
For information on all three fellowships:
http://www.amphilsoc.org/library/fellowships/long-term-pre-docs

American Philosophical Society Library Digital Humanities Fellowship
Two-month fellowship, open to scholars who are comfortable creating tools and visualizations, as well as those interested in working collaboratively with the APS technology team.
Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center ResidencyvariesDecember The Bellagio Residency program offers scholars, artists, thought leaders, policymakers and practitioners a serene setting conducive to focused, goal-oriented work and establish new connections with fellow residents, across a stimulating array of disciplines and geographies. Of particular interest are innovative projects that address one or more of the Rockefeller Foundation’s five interconnected issue areas: basic survival safeguards, global health, climate and environment, urbanization, social and economic security.
Library of Congress John W. Kluge Center Fellowships$4,200/monthJuly The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress invites qualified scholars to conduct research at the Kluge Center using the Library of Congress collections and resources for a period of four to eleven months. Established in 2000 through an endowment of $60 million from John W. Kluge, the Center is located in the splendid Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress. The Kluge Center furnishes attractive work and discussion space for Kluge Chair holders, for distinguished visiting scholars, and for post-doctoral Fellows supported by other private foundation gifts. Residents have easy access to the Library's specialized staff and to the intellectual community of Washington.

The Kluge Center especially encourages humanistic and social science research that makes use of the Library's large and varied collections. Interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, or multi-lingual research is particularly welcome. Among the collections available to researchers are the world's largest law library and outstanding multi-lingual collections of books and periodicals. Deep special collections of manuscripts, maps, music, films, recorded sound, prints and photographs are also available. Further information about the Library's collections can be found on the Library's website: http://www.loc.gov/rr/.
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Collaborative Research Grants$25,000-$100,000December The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency created in 1965. It is one of the largest funders of humanities programs in the United States.

Because democracy demands wisdom, NEH serves and strengthens our republic by promoting excellence in the humanities and conveying the lessons of history to all Americans. The Endowment accomplishes this mission by awarding grants for top-rated proposals examined by panels of independent, external reviewers.

NEH grants typically go to cultural institutions, such as museums, archives, libraries, colleges, universities, public television, and radio stations, and to individual scholars. The grants:

strengthen teaching and learning in schools and colleges
facilitate research and original scholarship
provide opportunities for lifelong learning
preserve and provide access to cultural and educational resources
strengthen the institutional base of the humanities
"The term 'humanities' includes, but is not limited to, the study and interpretation of the following: language, both modern and classical; linguistics; literature; history; jurisprudence; philosophy; archaeology; comparative religion; ethics; the history, criticism and theory of the arts; those aspects of social sciences which have humanistic content and employ humanistic methods; and the study and application of the humanities to the human environment with particular attention to reflecting our diverse heritage, traditions, and history and to the relevance of the humanities to the current conditions of national life."
--National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act, 1965, as amended
American Antiquarian Society FellowshipsVariesvariesVisiting fellowships for historical research by creative and performing artists, writers, film makers, journalists, and other persons whose goals are to produce imaginative, non-formulaic works dealing with pre-twentieth-century American history. The American Antiquarian Society offers three broad categories of visiting research fellowships,
with tenures ranging from one to twelve months.

All of the fellowships are designed to enable academic and independent scholars and advanced
graduate students to spend an uninterrupted block of time doing research in the AAS library.

Discussing this work with staff and other readers is a hallmark of an AAS fellowship.
American Association of University Women Postdoctoral Research Leave Fellowships$30,000 November American Postdoctoral Research Leave Fellowships

Postdoctoral Research Leave Fellowships are designed to assist scholars in obtaining tenure and other promotions by enabling them to spend a year pursuing independent research. The primary purpose of the fellowship is to increase the number of women in tenure-track faculty positions and to promote equality for women in higher education. Tenured professors are not eligible.
American Association of University Women Summer/Short-Term Research Publication Grants$6,000 November American Summer/Short-Term Research Publication Grants

Summer/Short-Term Research Publication Grants provide funds for women college and university faculty and independent researchers to prepare research for publication. Time must be available for eight consecutive weeks of final writing and editing in response to issues raised in critical reviews. These grants can be awarded to both tenure-track and part-time faculty, and new and established researchers. The grants are designed to assist the candidate in obtaining tenure and other promotions. Tenured professors are not eligible.
American Councils for International Education Title VIII Research Scholar Programup to $25,000October With funds from the U.S. Department of State (Title VIII), American Councils administers several major grants for independent, overseas policy relevant research in the humanities and social sciences as well as language training. In recent years, American Councils scholars have conducted independent research in Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Ukraine.
American Political Science Association Congressional Fellowship Program $38,000 December The American Political Science Association's Congressional Fellowship Program is a highly selective, nonpartisan program devoted to expanding knowledge and awareness of Congress. Since 1953, it has brought select political scientists, journalists, federal employees, health policy specialists, and international scholars to Capitol Hill to experience Congress at work.

The program lasts nine months, beginning in November and ending in mid-August. Fellows spend the month of November in an intensive orientation where they participate in daily seminars with policy specialists, congressional staffers, scholars, and journalists. After orientation Fellows work on a congressional staff of their choosing.

Through this unique opportunity, the American Political Science Association enhances public understanding of policy-making and improves the quality of scholarship, teaching and reporting on American national politics.
Bogliasco Foundation Bogliasco FellowshipsvariesJanuary and SeptemberLocated in the fishing village of Bogliasco near Genoa, a region of extraordinary beauty whose landscape has stimulated creative expression for centuries, the Bogliasco Foundation offers one-month residencies to individuals of all nations who can demonstrate notable achievement in the Arts and Humanities.
Apply

Each year, the Bogliasco Foundation awards approximately 50 Fellowships, without regard to nationality, age, race, gender, or religion, in any subject area of the following disciplines: archaeology, architecture, classics, dance, film/video, history, landscape architecture, literature, music, philosophy, theater, visual arts.
Fellows

In 19 years, the Study Center has welcomed over 800 Fellows from 55 different countries. In the 2015-2016 academic year, 48 Fellows from 18 countries will come to Bogliasco to work on projects that will enrich the global cultural landscape.
Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange Research GrantsvariesOctoberBASIC REQUIREMENTS
Scholars at academic institutions are eligible to apply for research grants. Researchers focusing on the social, cultural, economic or political development of Taiwan over the past few decades are especially encouraged to apply. Priority will be given to collaborative projects with scholars in Taiwan. Research grants are usually given for no more than two years.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
1. The Foundation's grants provide support for research on Chinese Studies in the humanities and social sciences.
2. Funding is not provided for capital equipment (including computers and printers), building design, construction, or maintenance.
3. Funding is not available for university administrative costs including overhead or endowments.
4. The Foundation does not subsidize administrative expenses or the purchase of equipment.
5. Foundation funds can only be transferred to and managed by institutional accounts. Letters of support from the applicant's institution must express the institution's willingness to comply with these procedures.
6. With the exception of Senior Scholar Grants, the Foundation does not supply funding for the salaries for project directors or co-directors.
7. The Foundation does not fund library acquisitions.
8. An applicant who already has a two-year research grant is not eligible to apply for a CCK Grant for Scholars that would run concurrently with the research grant. The research grant must end before an applicant can apply for a CCK Grant for Scholars.
9. The Foundation encourages applications with matching funds from other sources.
10. The Foundation reserves the right to post project abstracts and reports on its websites.
Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange Scholar Grants (Non-Residential Sabbatical)$35,000 - $40,000OctoberBASIC REQUIREMENTS

1. Scholar Grants:

Tenured faculty, including full professors and associate professors, may apply for a CCK Scholar Grant of up to $40,000 or $35,000, respectively, to help replace half of the salary of faculty on sabbatical, or for time off for research and writing. If grants from other sources are also awarded to the applicant, the Foundation’s grant, when added to the others, should not exceed the recipient’s annual salary. Applications should be accompanied by a letter of support from the chairman of the department, from the dean of the college or the provost of the university.

2. Junior Scholar Grants:

The Foundation provides grants for time off for research and writing to postdoctoral scholars and assistant professors without tenure who are affiliated with an accredited U.S. university and who have taught for no more than 6 years since receiving their Ph.D. degree. Applicants should include a letter of support from the chairman of their department as part of their application package. These grants will be for one year. The maximum amount of each award is $30,000.
Council for International Exchange of Scholars Fulbright Programs for US ScholarsvariesvariesThe Fulbright Core Scholar Program supports activities and projects that recognize and promote the critical relationship between educational exchange and international understanding, in addition to the intellectual merit of the proposals. Applications with broad multiplier effects are particularly welcome, as are projects that are conducive to candidates’ sharing of their experiences and knowledge with colleagues, students and, ideally, with the general public in their host country and, upon return, in the United States.
Review Criteria

As reviewers take into account the basic objectives of the Fulbright Scholar Program, they apply the following criteria:
Professional Qualifications

Credentials, training and professional standing.
Professional excellence, as evidenced through the quality of publications, grants, fellowships, honors, awards, conference papers, exhibitions, compositions, and performances.
Record of service to the field and the home institution.

Teaching Awards

Match of academic, professional or artistic expertise to the award.
Teaching ability and requisite experience at the postsecondary level, as evidenced by the applicant’s C.V., teaching awards, the quality of submitted syllabi, innovative and effective pedagogical approaches, and/or curriculum projects, and attested to by one of the three letters of reference.
Quality and feasibility of the proposed teaching project: appropriateness of proposed courses to host institution, including demonstrated flexibility in course design to adapt it to the needs of the host student audience; currency in proposed teaching topics; evidence of host institution interest and affiliation, if indicated in the award description.
Outcomes, potential impact and benefits: ability to address the needs and interests of the host institution and host country, and to contribute to curriculum and program development at the host institution, if desired in the award description; benefits to students at home and host institutions; potential for outreach to the public in host and home country, and to establish lasting connections and ties with students, colleagues, and/or institutions in the host country.

Research Awards

Intellectual merits of the proposal: rigor of research design and methodology; originality and conceptual sophistication; project’s significance.
Suitability: relevant and appropriate research experience and expertise to complete the proposed research activity successfully.
Feasibility in terms of resources available and time allocated to the project.
Need for residence in host country to accomplish the project.
Evidence of host institution interest and affiliation, if indicated in the award description.
Outcomes, potential impact and benefits: quality of research output and plans to disseminate research results in the U.S. and abroad; potential to advance knowledge; significance of research to applicant's field and professional development, as well as to the interests and needs of the host country; potential for outreach to the public in host and home country, and to establish lasting connections and ties with collaborators, the wider research community, and/or institutions abroad.

Foreign Language Proficiency

Foreign language proficiency as specified in the award description, or commensurate with the requirements of the proposed project. (Note: in many world areas, English is sufficient for lecturing.)

Previous Fulbright Awards

Compelling justification for a repeat Fulbright grant: evidence of outcomes and sustained professional, institutional, and/or personal ties resulting from previous Fulbright grant; explanation of how subsequent Fulbright grant will build on the previous one.
Where there is competition for grants, preference will be given to candidates who have not had previous Fulbright grants, especially within the past ten years. View the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board’s policies on previous Fulbright Scholar grants here.

Previous Experience Abroad

Preference is generally given to candidates who have not had substantial recent experience abroad in the country to which they are applying (see eligibility). A candidate who has resided abroad for five or more consecutive years in the six-year period preceding the date of application is ineligible for a grant. For the purpose of this section, a candidate who has lived outside the United States for nine months or more during a calendar year is deemed to have resided abroad for that year.
In-country residence at the time of application or a recent extended stay may reduce chances for an award to that country. Duty abroad in the U.S. Armed Forces, however, is not considered disqualifying within the meaning of this section.

Personal Qualities

Ability to serve as a cultural ambassador for the United States, including, but not limited to personal attributes of collegiality, cultural adaptability and sensitivity.

Geographic Distribution

Other factors being equal, and to the extent possible, applicants are chosen to represent a broad geographic distribution, by both home state and type of institution.

Veterans of Military Service

Preference is given to veterans when other factors are equivalent.

- See more at: http://www.cies.org/review-criteria#sthash.LEaSG57X.dpuf
German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Faculty Research Visit Grant & Art Study2,240 Euros (max)May and OctoberDAAD New York is the representative office for North America and we offer a wide range of funding opportunities for students, faculty, administrators, and staff of higher education institutions located in the United States, Canada and their territories.

Our primary goal is to facilitate transatlantic mobility to Germany for US and Canadian scholars, therefore Germany must be a component of your intended academic travel.* Funding is awarded on a competitive basis; we consider the academic merit of the individual, the feasibility and quality of the proposal, and the impact of the applicant and application as a whole.
Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation Research Grants$15,000 - $40,000 per yearAugustThe foundation welcomes proposals from any of the natural and social sciences and the humanities that promise to increase understanding of the causes, manifestations, and control of violence and aggression. Highest priority is given to research that can increase understanding and amelioration of urgent problems of violence and aggression in the modern world.

Questions that interest the foundation concern violence and aggression in relation to social change, intergroup conflict, war, terrorism, crime, and family relationships, among other subjects. Research with no relevance to understanding human problems will not be supported, nor will proposals to investigate urgent social problems where the foundation cannot be assured that useful, sound research can be done. Priority will also be given to areas and methodologies not receiving adequate attention and support from other funding sources.
National Gallery of Art - Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts Senior Visiting Fellows$6,000 - $8,000March and SeptemberOne Paul Mellon Fellowship and four to six Ailsa Mellon Bruce, Samuel H. Kress, and William C. Seitz Senior Fellowships are awarded each academic year. Paul Mellon and Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellowships support research in the history, theory, and criticism of the visual arts of any geographic area and of any period. Samuel H. Kress Senior Fellowships support research on European art before the early 19th century. The William C. Seitz Senior Fellowship primarily supports research on modern and contemporary art. Senior fellowship applications are also solicited from scholars in other disciplines whose work examines artifacts or has implications for the analysis and criticism of forms.
National Gallery of Art - Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts Senior FellowsUp to $50,000October Paul Mellon and Ailsa Mellon Bruce Visiting Senior Fellowships support research in the history, theory, and criticism of the visual arts of any geographic area and of any period. Visiting senior fellowship applications are also solicited from scholars in other disciplines whose work examines artifacts or has implications for the analysis and criticism of visual forms.
National Geographic Society National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program$5,000 - $15,000openThe National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program funds projects that require venture capital, supporting exceptional projects while foregoing a time-consuming peer-review process. NGS/Waitt grants are able to fund "proof of concept" research for applicants at an earlier stage in their careers than other NGS grant programs. Special emphasis is placed on expedited grant processing and turnaround. The selection committee endeavors to have funding decisions made within ten weeks of application submission. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

Funding is not restricted to United States citizens. Applicants planning work in foreign countries should include at least one local collaborator as part of their research teams. The selection committee will not consider applications seeking support solely for laboratory work or archival research. While grants are awarded on the basis of scientific merit and exist independent of the National Geographic Society's other divisions, grant recipients are expected to provide National Geographic with rights of first refusal for popular publication of their findings.

This grant program does not pay educational tuition, nor does it offer scholarships or fellowships of any kind.
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellowships for Creative Artists, Humanists, and Social Scientists$32,500 - $65,000Fall Women and men at the forefront of the arts, humanities, journalism, sciences, and social science apply to our competitive Fellowship Program to pursue bold ideas, artistic endeavors, or new research. Applicants are from across Harvard University and around the world. Radcliffe Institute fellows receive a stipend of up to $75,000 for one year.
GRAMMY Foundation Scientific Research Projects Grant Program Up to $20,000OctoberWith funding generously provided by The Recording Academy, the GRAMMY Foundation Grant Program awards grants each year to organizations and individuals to support efforts that advance the archiving and preservation of the music and recorded sound heritage of North America, and research projects related to the impact of music on the human condition.
The GRAMMY Foundation Grant Program awards grants to organizations and individuals to support research on the impact of music on the human condition. Examples might include the study of the effects of music on mood, cognition and healing, as well as the medical and occupational well-being of music professionals and the creative process underlying music. Priority is given to projects with strong methodological design as well those addressing an important research question.
Grant funds have been utilized to preserve private collections as well as materials at the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian and numerous colleges and universities. Research projects have studied the links between music and early childhood education, treatments for illnesses and injuries common to musicians, and the impact of music therapy on populations from infants to the elderly. More than $6 million in grants has been awarded to more than 300 recipients.
GRAMMY Foundation Archiving and Preservation Projects$5,000 - $20,000OctoberWith funding generously provided by The Recording Academy, the GRAMMY Foundation Grant Program awards grants each year to organizations and individuals to support efforts that advance the archiving and preservation of the music and recorded sound heritage of North America, and research projects related to the impact of music on the human condition.
The GRAMMY Foundation Grant Program awards grants to organizations and individuals to support efforts that advance the archiving and preservation of the music and recorded sound heritage of the Americas. The Archiving and Preservation area has two funding categories. To determine under which category of preservation grant you should apply, please click here.
Grant funds have been utilized to preserve private collections as well as materials at the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian and numerous colleges and universities. Research projects have studied the links between music and early childhood education, treatments for illnesses and injuries common to musicians, and the impact of music therapy on populations from infants to the elderly. More than $6 million in grants has been awarded to more than 300 recipients.
United States Institute of Peace (USIP) Annual Grant Competition$50,000 - $120,000OctoberA flagship from the Institute's earliest days, USIPs Grant Program has supported and furthered the work of individuals and institutions in the United States and around the world to advance the conflict resolution and peacebuilding fields – and to promote peace. The Institute remains committed to the support of peacebuilding researchers and practitioners globally to develop, test, and apply nonviolent approaches to resolving conflict and advancing peace.

Over the past 30 years, the peacebuilding field has matured and consolidated. It now requires a new focused investment in its conceptual and practical development. Accordingly, the Institute has restructured its grantmaking to fund and support targeted opportunities to advance peacebuilding research and practice. The Institute’s Annual Grant Competition (AGC) has been replaced by focused grantmaking to support institutions that test and advance models of peacebuilding practice, and build the capacity of partners in conflict countries to implement and assess the effectiveness of creative peacebuilding strategies.

The Institute has been proud to support the field of peacebuilding in its initial phases and to seed its intellectual development through seminal studies, such Ashutosh Varshney’s Ethnic Conflict and Civil Life: Hindus and Muslims in India; Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela’s A Human Being Died that Night: A South African Woman Confronts the Legacy of Apartheid: and, I. William Zartman and Guy Olivier Faure’s Engaging Extremists: Trade-offs, Timing and Diplomacy. To raise public awareness of conflict and peace-related issues in the U.S. and around the world, USIP has funded documentary films, such as the Emmy-award winning In Rwanda We Say...The Family That Does Not Speak Dies, which explores the Gacaca, a community-based form of participatory justice, and State of Fear, winner of the Henry Hampton Award for Excellence in Film and Digital Media and based on the findings of the Peruvian Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

For information about projects receiving USIP awards through the 2013 Annual Grant Competition, the Institute’s last such competition, see the project descriptions below.

Click here for details about the new grant opportunities now being offered by the Institute – opportunities that reinforce the major threads of USIP’s programmatic work, including the application of new technologies in the service of peace; inclusivity and participation in peace processes; conflict resolution and peace education and training; and the promotion of nonviolent approaches to resolving conflict.
Wabash Center Project Grants Up to $20,000March and OctoberThe Wabash Center provides funds for activities that enhance teaching and learning in the fields of religion and theology. It seeks to fund projects that promote a sustained conversation about pedagogy through the improvement of practical applications of teaching and learning methods, the encouragement of research and study of pedagogical issues, and the creation of a supportive environment for teaching.

The grant program is concerned primarily with building the capacity of institutions and faculties for sustained pedagogical conversations. It also serves to empower and encourage others to initiate relevant change within their home institutions. In addition, all applications are expected to reference specific classroom practices and challenges.

Grant Levels
Small Project Grants for amounts up to $5,000 (previously the maximum was $2,500) have a short application process and can be approved anytime throughout the year. Rolling Deadline

Large Project Grants for amounts up to $30,000 (previously the maximum was $20,000) require a full application process and are awarded at two different times during the year. Deadlines: March 1 and October 1

Annual Deadlines
• March 1
• October 1
• Small Project Grants (up to $5,000) can be submitted at any time during the year.

Activities Funded
Projects might involve meetings of scholars across schools, regions, denominations, or subject areas to think about syllabi, teaching strategies, student learning styles, or teaching as a vocation. Or they might involve a single department experimenting with creative ways to enhance teaching or a doctoral institution helping their students prepare for teaching careers. We encourage interested applicants to propose creative projects that will enhance their particular teaching and learning contexts.
Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. Research Fellowships Research Fellowships Up to $5,000AugustScholars are invited to apply for the Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. Research Fellowships. The fellowships are administered by the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation from income provided by the Schlesinger Fund.

Schlesinger Fellowships carry a stipend of up to $5,000, which may be awarded to a single individual or divided between two recipients. The fellowships are intended to support scholars in the production of substantial works in either of the following areas: the foreign policy of the Kennedy Presidency, especially in the Western Hemisphere; or the Kennedy Administration's domestic policy, particularly with regard to racial justice or the conservation of natural resources. The successful candidate(s) will develop at least a portion of their original research using archival materials from the Kennedy Library.
The Camargo FoundationVariesvariesThe Foundation’s primary program consists of individual fellowship residencies of one to three months. The Foundation welcomes applications from individuals in the following areas:

Scholars and thinkers in arts and humanities should be working in French and Francophone cultures, including cross-cultural studies that engage the cultures and influences of the Mediterranean region. Thinkers include professionals such as curators, artistic and executive directors of cultural organizations, cultural critics, and academic deans
Artists, in all disciplines, who are the primary creators of new work

The Camargo Foundation welcomes scholars and artists from all countries and nationalities as well as all career levels.
Howard Foundation$33,000NovemberThe Howard Foundation awards a limited number of fellowships each year for independent projects in selected fields, targeting its support specifically to early mid-career individuals, those who have achieved recognition for at least one major project. Approximately ten fellowships of $33,000 will be awarded in April 2016 for 2016-2017 in the fields of

Creative Non-Fiction, Literary Translation into English, Film Studies, and Literary Studies

Howard Fellowships are intended primarily to provide artists, scholars, and writers with time to complete their work. They are not intended for publication subsidies, for equipment purchase, for preparation of exhibits, or to support institutional programs. The deadline for submission of applications is November 15, 2015. Fellowship recipients will be announced in April 2016.

Fellowships are offered in a five-year sequence of fields. Successful candidates are given the option of postponing receipt of their fellowship, so as to make the Howard competition accessible to those whose personal plans do not line up exactly with the year in which awards are offered in their fields.

Candidates can establish their eligibility for a Howard Fellowship by considering a series of questions before they submit an application. Information on completing an application will be available here by June 1, 2015.

The George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation was established in 1952 by Nicea Howard in memory of her grandparents. Miss Howard had a special interest in furthering the personal development of promising individuals at the crucial middle stages of their careers in the liberal and creative arts.

The Howard Foundation Lecture is an occasional series for which the Foundation invites a former Fellow to the Brown University campus for a public presentation in his or her area of expertise.
Huntington Fellowships$3,000-$50,000NovemberHuntington Fellowships

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage.
Tenure of fellowship: One to five months.
Amount of award: $3,000 per month.
NOTE: The majority of “Huntington Fellowships” will be awarded to scholars working in the general holdings of the Library; however, we do offer a number of specialized fellowships:

Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowships in Renaissance England
Reese Fellowship in American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas
Trent R. Dames Fellowship in the History of Civil Engineering
Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fellowships
Francis J. Weber Research Fellowship in Roman Catholic History
Cheng Fellowship in the History of the Asian American Experience in the U.S.

Applying for one of the specialized fellowships does not disqualify you from being considered for a “Huntington Fellowship.”



Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage. Applicant must be based in the United States.

Tenure of fellowship: One month.
The Huntington offers several travel grants in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong and where the research will be carried out in libraries or archives in Great Britain. We also offer exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, Lincoln, and New Colleges, Oxford; and with Trinity Hall, Cambridge.



Linacre College, Oxford
A stipend of $3,000 is provided by the Huntington to the recipient of the fellowship before traveling to England, along with reimbursement for economy round-trip airfare. Accommodation is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July of 2016; the fellow is responsible for paying for the accommodation. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.



Corpus Christi College/Lincoln College/New College/Trinity Hall
Accommodation and hospitality is provided by the college, although the timing of the fellowship may be subject to the availability of housing options and to the rhythms of the academic year. The Huntington will reimburse the fellow for economy round-trip airfare before going to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.



Travel Grants
Recipients of the travel grants must be conducting research in a library or archive in Great Britain in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong. The Huntington will reimburse the grantee for economy round-trip airfare before the trip. A stipend of $3,000 will be paid after the grantee submits a detailed report on the research conducted. The travel grants can be taken up as early as June 1, 2016, and no later than June 30, 2017.



Clark-Huntington Joint Bibliographical Fellowship
Eligibility: PhD or appropriate research experience.
Tenure of fellowship: Two months (one month at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library; one month at The Huntington).
Amount of award: $5,500.
Sponsored jointly by the Clark and the Huntington Libraries, this two-month fellowship provides support for bibliographical research in early modern British literature and history as well as other areas where the two libraries have common strengths; eligible projects include textual scholarship, analytical/descriptive bibliography, history of printing and/or publishers, and related fields. For details and application instructions regarding this fellowship only, please contact Myrna Ortiz at ortiz@humnet.ucla.edu.
Long-Term Awards

(On your cover sheet, please indicate “Long-Term Award.” Your application will be considered for any of the long-term awards for which you are eligible.)



Barbara Thom Postdoctoral Fellowships
Eligibility: Non-tenured faculty.
Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.
Amount of award: $50,000.
Fellowship is designed to support non-tenured faculty who are revising their dissertation for publication. Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington's collections and must have received their PhD between 2011 and 2013.



Mellon Fellowship
Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2015.
Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.
Amount of award: $50,000.
Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington's collections.



Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship
Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2015.
Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.
Amount of award: $50,000.
Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington's collections.



Molina Fellowship in the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov.15, 2015.
Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.
Amount of award: $50,000.
Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in the history of medicine and related sciences, including public health.



National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships
Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2015, and must be a United States citizen or foreign national with a minimum of three years U.S. residence.
Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.
Amount of award: $50,000 ($4,200 per month from NEH; balance of stipend from Huntington funds)
Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington's collections.
John F. Kennedy Research Fellowships & GrantsvariesvariesThe John F. Kennedy Library Foundation offers competitive research fellowships and grants every year to scholars and students who wish to make use of the archival holdings (including audiovisual materials) of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.

Factors to keep in mind when applying for our research fellowships:

Candidates may apply for only one fellowship in a given year.
The review committee will assess each application with the most relevant fellowship opportunity in mind.
Only complete applications (pdf) will be considered; those received after the deadline will be considered for the next funding cycle.



Marjorie Kovler Research Fellowship

One per year. Stipend of up to $2,500. Preference is given to research on foreign intelligence and the presidency, or a related topic. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. Research Fellowship

Up to two per year. Stipend of up to $5,000 (total). Preference is given to research in either of the following areas: the foreign policy of the Kennedy Presidency, especially in the Western Hemisphere; or the Kennedy Administration's domestic policy, particularly with regard to racial justice or the conservation of natural resources. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Abba P. Schwartz Research Fellowship

One per year. Stipend of up to $3,100. Preference is given to research on immigration, naturalization, or refugee policy. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Theodore C. Sorensen Research Fellowship

One per year. Stipend of up to $3,600. Preference is given to research on domestic policy, political journalism, polling, or press relations. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Ernest Hemingway Research Grants

Multiple per year. Grant of $200 to $1,000 per person. Preference is given to dissertation research in newly-opened or under-utilized portions of the Hemingway Collection. Application deadline: November 2. Award announced: December 14.
Newberry Library FellowshipsvariesNov/DecNewberry fellowships provide support for researchers who wish to use our collection. We promise you intriguing and often rare materials; a lively, interdisciplinary community of researchers; individual consultations on your research with staff curators, librarians, and other scholars; and an array of both scholarly and public programs. The Newberry administers annual competitions for both Long-Term Fellowships of 4 to 12 months and Short-Term Fellowships of 1 to 2 months.

Short-Term Fellowships are primarily intended to assist researchers who need to examine specific items in the Newberry’s collection and are mostly restricted to individuals who live outside the Chicago area. Long-Term Fellowships are generally available without regard to an applicant’s place of residence and are intended to support significant works of scholarship that draw on the strengths of the Newberry’s collection.

The Newberry also offers many special awards and fellowships which carry specific requirements. To learn more about these requirements, please visit How to Apply. Applicants with individual questions regarding eligibility or other matters should read this information carefully before addressing questions to research@newberry.org or (312) 255-3666.
New York Public Library Research FellowshipsvariesvariesThe New York Public Library is pleased to offer Short Term Research Fellowships to support scholars from outside the New York metropolitan area engaged in graduate-level, post-doctoral, and independent research. Individuals needing to conduct on-site research in the Library’s special collections to support projects in the humanities, business and the arts are welcome to apply. Preference is given to scholars whose work is based on materials in the NYPL research collections, especially when those materials are unique.

The Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery is pleased to offer two long-term fellowships to assist scholars whose research on transatlantic slavery can benefit from extended access to the Schomburg Center's resources. These fellowships will allow recipients to spend six months in residence with an office, a computer, and full access to physical and electronic resources at the Schomburg Center and other research units of The New York Public Library.

The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers is an international fellowship program open to people whose work will benefit directly from access to the collections at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building—including academics, independent scholars, and creative writers (novelists, playwrights, poets). The Center appoints 15 Fellows a year for a nine-month term at the Library, from September through May. In addition to working on their own projects, the Fellows engage in an ongoing exchange of ideas within the Center and in public forums throughout the Library.

The Schomburg Center Scholars-in-Residence Program assists those scholars and professionals whose research in the black experience can benefit from extended access to the Center's resources. Fellowships funded by the Center will allow recipients to spend six months in residence with access to resources at the Schomburg Center and other centers of The New York Public Library. The program encourages research and writing on black history and culture, facilitates interaction among participating scholars, and provides widespread dissemination of findings through lectures, publications, and colloquia and seminars. It encompasses projects in African, Afro-American, and Afro-Caribbean history and culture.

he Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation have created the Schomburg-Mellon Humanities Summer Institute to encourage minority students and others with an interest in African-American , African, and African Diasporan Studies to pursue graduate degrees, especially PhDs, in the humanities.

The Martin Duberman Visiting Scholar program at The New York Public Library fosters excellence in LGBT studies by providing funds for scholars to do research in the Library’s preeminent LGBT historical collections. The fellowship is open to both academic faculty and independent scholars who have made a significant contribution to the field. The recipient of the award will receive $15,000 to fund their research at the Library. The awardee will be expected to spend a minimum of three months researching at the Library and at other archives relevant to their topic in the New York City area, to give a public talk on their work, and to write a short piece about their project for the Library’s website.

The RSA–Kress New York Public Library Grant supports a one-month residence in New York City by a member of the RSA for the purposes of Art History research in the Special Collections of The New York Public Library.

The mission of the Gilder Lehrman Institute is to promote the study of American history, a goal that it serves in part through a scholarly fellowship program for work in four historical archives in New York City, including The New York Public Library.
Smithsonian Institute FellowshipsvariesvariesSmithsonian fellowships are awarded competitively to graduate, pre-doctoral, or post-doctoral students – or granted non-competitively to visiting professionals, students, scientists, or scholars – are offered to individuals who design and develop proposals for independent study or collaborative research in fields pursued by and of interest to Smithsonian staff. Smithsonian fellows are generally appointed to terms lasting between 1 to 3 years.

Smithsonian fellowships offer an incredible range of research opportunities. Because experts in the Smithsonian’s various units (Natural History Museum, Smithsonian Libraries, American Art Museum, etc) understands their respective subject areas, collections, and opportunities for research best, the selection process for different fellowships varies.
Woodrow Wilson Internation Center for ScholarsvariesvariesThe Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars welcomes outstanding and award winning scholars, practitioners, journalists and public intellectuals to take part in its non-partisan dialogue. Each year, the Center hosts around 160 scholars who conduct independent research on national and/or international issues addressing key public policy challenges. Through its scholars, the Center enriches crucial policy debates and provides a platform for scholars in the tradition of President Wilson to bring the worlds of policy and ideas together. In addition to its flagship international Fellowship program, the Center also hosts scholars selected through its individual programs.
American Council of Learned Societies Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars$75,000SeptemberACLS invites applications for the Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars, made possible by the generous assistance of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The fellowships are named for the late Frederick Burkhardt, president emeritus of ACLS, whose decades of work on The Correspondence of Charles Darwin constitute a signal example of dedication to a demanding and ambitious scholarly enterprise. These fellowships support long-term, unusually ambitious projects in the humanities and related social sciences. The ultimate goal of the project should be a major piece of scholarly work by the applicant. ACLS does not fund creative work (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translation, or pedagogical projects.

New in the 2015-16 competition, the Burkhardt program has been expanded into two sets of opportunities for recently tenured humanists. The first set of Burkhardt Fellowships continue to support an academic year (nine months) of residence at any one of the 13 participating residential research centers, and are open to faculty at any degree-granting academic institution in the United States. An additional set of Burkhardt Fellowships are designated specifically for liberal arts college faculty and support an academic year of residence at a wider range of locations including campus humanities centers and university academic departments to be proposed by the applicant. (Liberal arts college faculty may apply for either of the Burkhardt awards and should select the fellowship opportunity that will best serve their project.)
Coro Fellows ProgramvariesJanuaryThe Fellows Program in Public Affairs is a nine-month, full-time, post-graduate experiential leadership training program which introduces diverse, intelligent and driven individuals to all aspects of the public affairs arena. Field assignments, site visits, interviews and special individual and group projects prepare Coro Fellows to translate their ideals into action for improving their own communities.

Sixty-eight Fellows are chosen annually each year through a highly competitive selection process for
a nine-month, full-time, post-graduate experiential leadership training program which introduces diverse, intelligent and driven individuals to all aspects of the public affairs arena.

Coro Fellows are diverse, talented individuals committed to positive change in their communities throughout their lives and careers. They are emerging innovators in business, policy and government who demonstrate exceptional leadership through their accomplishments, curiosity and civic involvement.

Fellows are brought together by a common interest in creative leadership and civic engagement, and building strong connections that will support them as they drive impact in their cities and organizations.

Applicants may include individuals who have recently completed their undergraduate or graduate degrees, as well as those with several years of work experience. Competitively selected applicants will join an intimate cohort of 12 participants for the nine-month program, with each cohort encompassing a wide range of communities, interests, ideologies and experiences.

Projects provide Coro Fellows with the opportunity to truly learn by experience. Throughout the nine months, each Fellow participates in a series of full-time projects across a variety of sectors in public affairs, including a final independent project of the Fellow’s choosing. Sectors may include:
Government | Business | Electoral Politics | Organized Labor | Media | Non-profit/Philanthropy

These diverse projects aim to both complement and challenge the Fellow’s experiences and interests. The high level of access available to Fellows in each of their projects ensures a remarkable behind-the-scenes view of each organization and necessitates complete confidentiality. Elected officials, staffers, department heads, executive directors, and CEO’s provide the knowledge and perspective to help Fellows assess how organizations get things done in the social, political, and economic spheres.For the final independent project, Fellows are allowed to choose and develop their own individual project in cooperation with an agency. This process allows Fellows to explore an area of interest while developing negotiating skills.
Dirksen Congressional Center Congressional Research Grants$3,500March The Dirksen Congressional Center invites applications for grants to fund research on congressional leadership and the U.S. Congress. The Center, named for the late Senate Minority Leader Everett M. Dirksen, is a private, nonpartisan, nonprofit research and educational organization devoted to the study of Congress. Since 1978, the Congressional Research Grants program has invested more than $998,026 to support over 451 projects. Applications are accepted at any time, but the deadline is March 1 for the annual selections, which are announced in April.

The Center has allocated $50,000 in 2016 for grants with individual awards capped at $3,500. Stay tuned for news on the application and selection process.

Who is qualified to apply?

The competition is open to individuals with a serious interest in studying Congress. Political scientists, historians, biographers, scholars of public administration or American studies, and journalists are among those eligible. The Center encourages graduate students who have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus to apply and awards a significant portion of the funds for dissertation research. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who reside in the United States.

The grants program does not fund undergraduate or pre-Ph.D. study. Organizations are not eligible. Research teams of two or more individuals are eligible. No institutional overhead or indirect costs may be claimed against a Congressional Research Grant.

What kind of research projects are eligible for consideration?

The Center’s first interest is to fund the study of the leadership in the Congress, both House and Senate. Topics could include external factors shaping the exercise of congressional leadership, institutional conditions affecting it, resources and techniques used by leaders, or the prospects for change or continuity in the patterns of leadership. In addition, The Center invites proposals about congressional procedures, such as committee operation or mechanisms for institutional change, and Congress and the electoral process.

The Center also encourages proposals that link Congress and congressional leadership with the creation, implementation, and oversight of public policy. Proposals must demonstrate that Congress, not the specific policy, is the central research interest.

The Center does NOT require grant recipients to use historical materials in its collections. For persons interested in such research, however, please visit http://www.dirksencenter.org/print_collections_overview.htm for information about our holdings.

The research for which assistance is sought must be original, culminating in new findings or new interpretation, or both. The grants program was developed to support work intended for publication in some form or for application in a teaching or policy-making setting. Research produced by previous grant recipients has resulted in books, papers, articles, course lectures, videotapes, and computer software.

What could a Congressional Research Grant pay for?

Generally speaking, a grant can cover almost any aspect of a qualified research project, such as travel to conduct research, duplication of research material, purchase of data sets, and costs of clerical, secretarial, research, or transcription assistance. This list is merely illustrative. Specifically excluded from funding are the purchase of equipment, tuition support, salary support for the principal investigator(s), indirect costs or institutional overhead, travel to professional meetings, and publication subsidies.
Johnson Presidential Library Middleton Fellowship in Presidential Studies$5,000January and June Lady Bird Johnson created the Harry Middleton fellowship to support scholarly work in Presidential studies and to honor Mr. Middleton’s contributions to the Presidential library system. Harry Middleton was a speechwriter for President Johnson and served as Director of the LBJ Library from 1972 to 2002.

Fellowship recipients must conduct research at the LBJ Library and at least one other facility of the National Archives and Records Administration. Post-doctoral fellows may apply, but preference is given to doctoral students whose dissertation research highlights how history can illuminate current and future policy issues.

The Foundation generally awards two $5,000 fellowships annually. A larger amount may be awarded when special circumstances, such as international travel, warrant it.
Kennedy Library Research Grants and FellowshipsVariesVariesThe John F. Kennedy Library Foundation offers competitive research fellowships and grants every year to scholars and students who wish to make use of the archival holdings (including audiovisual materials) of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.

Factors to keep in mind when applying for our research fellowships:

Candidates may apply for only one fellowship in a given year.
The review committee will assess each application with the most relevant fellowship opportunity in mind.
Only complete applications (pdf) will be considered; those received after the deadline will be considered for the next funding cycle.



Marjorie Kovler Research Fellowship

One per year. Stipend of up to $2,500. Preference is given to research on foreign intelligence and the presidency, or a related topic. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. Research Fellowship

Up to two per year. Stipend of up to $5,000 (total). Preference is given to research in either of the following areas: the foreign policy of the Kennedy Presidency, especially in the Western Hemisphere; or the Kennedy Administration's domestic policy, particularly with regard to racial justice or the conservation of natural resources. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Abba P. Schwartz Research Fellowship

One per year. Stipend of up to $3,100. Preference is given to research on immigration, naturalization, or refugee policy. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Theodore C. Sorensen Research Fellowship

One per year. Stipend of up to $3,600. Preference is given to research on domestic policy, political journalism, polling, or press relations. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Ernest Hemingway Research Grants

Multiple per year. Grant of $200 to $1,000 per person. Preference is given to dissertation research in newly-opened or under-utilized portions of the Hemingway Collection. Application deadline: November 2. Award announced: December 14.
Miller Center of Public Affairs Fellowships in Contemporary History, Public Policy, and American Politics$22,000FebruaryThe Miller Center Fellowship program funds scholars completing dissertations that employ history to shed light on American politics and public policy, foreign relations and the impact of global affairs on the United States, media and politics, and the role of the presidency in shaping American political development. In academic year 2016-2017 the program will fund up to ten fellowships to support one year of dissertation research and writing. Each fellow, with the exception of the Charles W. McCurdy Legal History Fellow and the Hagley/Miller Center Fellow in Business and Politics, will receive a stipend of $22,000. (The McCurdy Fellow will receive a stipend of $32,000 and the Business and Politics Fellows will receive a stipend of $24,000).

Along with the fellowship grant, the Miller Center assists the fellow in choosing a senior scholar from their field to serve as fellowship "mentor." This mentor will suggest relevant literature to frame the project, read the fellow's work, and give general advice on research. Fellows are also trained in bringing their scholarship to bear on public debates and formally present their scholarly work. Fellows attend the annual spring fellowship conference at the Miller Center which brings the fellows, their mentors, and the Miller Center and U.Va. community together to critique the fellows' dissertation work.
National Endowment for Democracy FellowshipsvariesvariesIn the spirit of international exchange, the Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows Program, based at the International Forum for Democratic Studies, supports democratic activists, scholars, and journalists from around the world to conduct independent research, build individual capacity, and exchange ideas to strengthen democratic development in their countries, regions, or fields of expertise.

The Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows Program hosts democratic activists, scholars, and journalists for five-month fellowships, bringing fresh insights and perspectives to Washington, DC. The fellowship offers an important opportunity to explore new ideas in a comparative context, undertake individual research, and share best practices with one another.
Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR) Prizes and Fellowships$2,000-$5,000OctoberWilliam Appleman Williams Junior Faculty Research Grants

The William Appleman Williams Junior Faculty Research Grants are intended to promote scholarly research in U.S. foreign relations by untenured college and university faculty and others who are within six years of the Ph.D. and who are working as professional historians. Grants are limited to scholars working on the first research monograph. A limited number of grants of varying amounts (generally, up to $2,000) will be awarded annually to help defray the costs of domestic or international travel necessary to conduct research on significant scholarly projects. The award is announced formally at the SHAFR luncheon held during the annual meeting of the American Historical Association. Membership in SHAFR is required.


The Myrna F. Bernath Fellowship

The Myrna F. Bernath Fellowship was established by the Bernath family to promote scholarship in U.S. foreign relations history by women. The Myrna Bernath Fellowship of up to $5,000 is intended to defray the costs of scholarly research by women. It is awarded biannually (in odd years) and announced at the SHAFR luncheon held during the annual meeting of the American Historical Association. Applications are welcomed from women at U.S. universities as well as women abroad who wish to do research in the United States. Preference will be given to graduate students and those within five years of completion of their PhDs. Membership in SHAFR is required.
Foundation for End-of-Life CarevariesvariesThe Foundation for End-of-Life Care, a not-for-profit organization established by Hugh Westbrook and Esther T. Colliflower, was created to improve end-of-life care for individual patients and their families, while supporting fundamental societal change. Hospice care is a very special type of care and philosophy which focuses on the terminally ill patients’ pain and symptoms, while at the same time, attending to their emotional and spiritual needs. It is estimated that less than one fourth of the terminally ill patients who could benefit from hospice ever use it. This lack of access denies patients and their families the medical, social and spiritual support necessary for a quality end of life experience.
The Purpose

shutterstock_160066073The Foundation will provide resources to advance the quality of end-of-life care in several ways:

“Special Needs” Grants for Individual Patients and Families – The Foundation makes grants to fund extraordinary expenses that lie outside the realm of hospice care but are critically important to the comfort or peace of mind of patients and their families.
Research Grants and Partnerships – The Foundation awards grants to fund promising research studies at sites throughout the country, including hospices, teaching hospitals, other providers and academic research centers.
Hospice Grants to Share Best Practices – The Foundation makes grants to hospice providers to facilitate the development and sharing of “best practice” caregiving models and techniques.
Assistance for Hospice Foundation of America Programs – The Foundation assists the Hospice Foundation of America in implementing specific programs, including clergy-to-clergy services, grief counseling activities and the annual National Bereavement Teleconference.
Benton Telecommunications Foundationup to $25,000variesAreas of Interest:

The foundation emphasizes grant making in the following areas:


Healthy Living:

Programs and initiatives which promote an integrated approach to healing and wellness including the mind, body, heart and spirit.

Basic Human Needs and Services:

Programs and initiatives which provide funds and assistance to suffering individuals and families who may need the following due to poverty, illness, sudden loss of property, or the result of a natural or civic disaster.

Food
Shelter
Clothing
Transportation
Healthcare


Educational and Personal Development:

Programs and initiatives for youth and adults leading to personal growth, societal impact and a deeper understanding of the world and its' diverse cultures.

Emphasis on youth leadership and mentoring.


Community Development:

Programs designed to develop and improve communities, with an emphasis on the municipalities located in Benton County, Minnesota.
Types and Amounts of Grants Awarded

Benton Telecommunications Foundation awards grants up to $25,000.
For requests under $2,000 the Small Grant Application is required.
For requests over $2,000 a 50% match and the Full Grant Application is required.
The GriffinHarte Foundationup to $1,000DecemberThe GriffinHarte Foundation is a nonprofit organization whose goal is to promote civil conversations about issues that divide us and are often contentious and difficult to sort through. These issues usually involve questions of fairness, equity, respect, identity (who we are) and the complex ways we are connected to other people. Most importantly, they almost always are related to the very foundations of our lives—so they require that we find ways to communicate effectively about them. Because the founders of the GriffinHarte Foundation, and its members, believe that communication is one of the key elements to understanding and working with our differences, the GriffinHarte Foundation is designed to do the following:

Support and promote conversations, research, and scholarship that are

grounded in questions and practices of civility and feminism;
informed by a desire to define, explore, and advocate for social, political, and economic justice in our professional and personal lives;
centered in an explicit recognition of the ways our lives and communication are influenced by our identities—our gender and sex, race and ethnicity, age and physical abilities, and education and economic standing.

Support and promote educational practices and research that are

focused on how we teach as well as what we teach;
grounded in a commitment to alternative pedagogies and educational practices;
informed by an explicit recognition of the ways identities, genders and sex, feminisms, civility, and civic engagement relate to social, political and economic justice.

Support and promote educational opportunities as they explore identity, gender, feminism, civility, civic engagement and social, political and economic justice.