Semester I, 2022-23

Virtually all courses in the English Department are open to all students, majors and non-majors alike. 100-level courses have no prerequisites. 200-level courses have Writing 120 (Writing and Rhetoric), Writing 111 (FYW), or its equivalent as a prerequisite. 300-level courses ordinarily build upon prior work in the English Department. 300-level creative writing courses generally require prior completion of a relevant a 200-level creative writing course as a prerequisite. 300-level courses in literary studies (English courses other than those in creative writing), generally require as prerequisites English 185 and two 200-level English courses. Any course offered in the English department can count as an elective in any of our majors (English, English with CAL, and Creative Writing).

100-level (Level I)

English 150 Craft of Creative Writing

This course introduces the craft of creative writing through contemporary readings and writing exercises in poetry and prose. Students learn to read and to write literature with attention to how a literary work is made. Emphasis on the elements of craft and revision provide preparation for students who want to continue into creative writing workshops at the 200- and 300-levels. Prerequisite: None. GE: WRI. OLE Core: CRE.

         Section A – C Bucciaglia
         Section B – K Schwehn

English 185 Literary Studies

The foundation course of the English major, English 185 introduces students to poetic and dramatic form, narrative structure, and critical theory. In addition, students engage with literature as a living practice and address its role in a culture by attending dramatic performance and readings by visiting writers and critics. Although texts vary with the instructor, all sections explore the contemporary vitality of literature in English and their strong connections to the past. Prerequisite: None. GE: ALS-L, WRI.

         Section A – K Marsalek
         Section B – B Klaver

200-level (Level II)

English 205 American Racial/Multicultural Literature – S Ward
OLd major Reqs: cross cultural, post 1800
New Major Reqs: american lit oR antiracism requirement

This course explores the experiences of an array of citizens in the U.S.: Native Americans, African Americans, Jewish Americans, Asian Americans, and Latin Americans. Our study covers such themes as their double consciousness, alienation, survival strategies, Americanization, and especially their unique stories and cultural traditions. In addition multicultural writers understandably express a concern with voice, and many of their protagonists desire to be heard and understood, at times around issues of gender, beauty, and violence. Linked to this issue of personal voice is protagonists’ search for an identity, a quest prompting them to embrace their ancestral pasts, only they cast the customs they come to value in the English language. Attention is given then to ways in which they mold the English language around their ethnocentric world views and narrative structures, separate at times from those mainstream white Americans. Aspects of culture differ with groups, as well. Of interest, too, are diverse images of mainstream identity and cultural practices, especially as they are projected in media and popular culture. In any case, our approach is literary. Prerequisite: WRR, FYW, or its equivalent. GE: ALS-L, MCD. OLE Core: PAR.

English 222 Ecocriticism and Renaissance Literature – M Trull
OLd major Reqs: literary history, PRE 1800
New Major Reqs: british lit, PRE 1800

This course introduces students to ecocriticism as a method of literary study by surveying English literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Students read ecocritical theory and study poetry, plays, and prose works by authors including William Shakespeare, John Milton, and Margaret Cavendish. Possible course themes include pastoral, sugar and slavery, consumption and waste, the Scientific Revolution, and animals. Assignments use digital technology to gather data, analyze literature in its historical context, and write for collaborative scholarly research initiatives. Offered periodically. Prerequisite: WRIT 120 or equivalent. GE: ALS-L, WRI. OLE Core: GHS, WAC.

English 223 Old and Middle English Lit: The Weird and the Wonderful – K Cherewatuk
OLd major Reqs: literary history, pre 1800
New Major Reqs: british lit, pre 1800

Two themes persist in early British literature: the role of fate (Old English wyrd) versus free will and the power of wonders–from the miraculous to the magical. These themes are traced in the Old English period in sermons, charms and riddles, biblical epics and Christian texts, and the heroic epic Beowulf. Readings from the Middle English period include lyric and ballad, romance from the Arthurian and non-Arthurian traditions, drama, allegory, mystical treatises, and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Also counts toward medieval studies major. Prerequisite: WRR, FYW, or its equivalent. GE: ALS-L, WRI. OLE Core: WAC.

English 228 Romantic/Victorian/Modern British Literature – S Ward
OLd major Reqs: literary history, Post 1800
New Major Reqs: british lit

This course explores British literature of three eras, from William Wordsworth and Mary Shelley to Virginia Woolf and Mulk Raj Anand. Students begin with the Romantic revolution of the late 18th century, traverse the wide 19th-century span of Queen Victoria’s reign, and cross into the modernist period after the cataclysm of World War I. Within each era, students examine a set of literary forms (novels, poems, plays, essays), as well as literature’s place within British culture. To this end, the course emphasizes the relationship between literary innovation and historical change within British and British imperial societies. In addition, we will consider the influence of other artforms on literary production, including dance, music, visual and plastic arts, fashion and design, and film. Prerequisite: FYW, WRR, or equivalent. GE: ALS-L, WRI. OLE Core: WAC.

English 251 Major Chicano/a Authors – R Guzmán
n (Cross Cultural, Post 1800)
OLd major Reqs: cross cultural, post 1800
New Major Reqs: american lit

Chicano/a identity is perhaps one of the most misunderstood racial/ethnic subjectivities in the United States. It encompasses many possible identities—such as Latino, Hispanic, and Mexican-American—while remaining politically and culturally distinct in its intended signification. Among all the racial and ethnic identities in the United States, it is perhaps the most politicized subject position, and intentionally so. The history of the term “Chicano/a” is itself defined by cultural tension, historical strife, and heated political debate. It is a term that many people, even those who technically qualify as Chicano or Chicana, feel uncomfortable with.

The main purpose of this course is to explore constructions of Chicano/a identity as expressed through the literature produced after the Civil Rights Movement (post-1964), with the intention of demystifying the contentious history underlying this subjectivity. By focusing primarily on the formation of Chicano/a identity in the U.S., the course aims at investigating the various discourses that influence the development of racial subjectivity in general. Prerequisite: WRR, FYW, or its equivalent. GE: ALS-L, MCD. OLE Core: PAR.

English 258 Folklore – J Mbele
OLd major Reqs: elective, post 1800
New Major Reqs: elective

Focuses on verbal folklore: narratives, songs and shorter forms such as proverbs. Explores the intrinsic qualities of each as literary creations and also the ways in which they operate together when combined or in dialogic relationship. The folktale or the epic, for example, incorporates a variety of these forms, such as the proverb, the song, or the riddle, to form a complex whole.Prerequisite: WRR, FYW, or its equivalent. GE: ALS-L, MCG. OLE Core: GHS.

English 272 Global Shakespeares – K Marsalek
OLd major Reqs: literary history, pre 1800
New Major Reqs: british lit, pre 1800

When Shakespeare first penned the phrase “All the world’s a stage” near the end of the sixteenth century, his plays were being performed on the stage of the Globe Theater in London. Over the last four hundred years, the entire globe has become a stage for Shakespeare’s plays, and this course will chart some of those journeys through space and time. We will study five of Shakespeare’s plays from four genres (comedy, history, romance, tragedy), first placing them in their initial historical contexts, and then
examining how these works have been translated, adapted, appropriated, revised and represented in performances around the world. Examples of such global responses will include The Maleceet Hamlet, a Francophone adaptation set in a First Nations community in Quebec; Omkara, a Bollywood version of Othello; a Korean Midsummer Night’s Dream, and manga versions of several plays. If possible, the class will attend a production of a play, and a course fee will cover tickets and transportation. “Global Shakespeares” carries ALS-L credit, and counts as a pre-1800 course for the English major. Prerequisite: WRI 120 or equivalent.

English 280 A Topic: Queer Literature & Theory- J Patterson
OLd major Reqs: genre, post 1800
New Major Reqs: elective

Through literature, film and theory, this course will highlight important questions about the politics and social dynamics of “queer” sexuality and gender and how some of the most interesting contemporary writers and artists explore these questions in their work. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which sexual identities intersect with and shape other categories of identity including gender, ethnicity, class, culture and nation. Our work together will work toward several goals: 1) to understand a literary work’s “queerness” in terms of form and style; 2) to gain a sense of the central concepts and debates in queer theory and politics; and 3) to apply theory to literature as well as real world issues. The arc of this course can be understood as a (mis)reading of the history of feminism; in particular we look at how queer theory is a part of the reaction of the perceived centering of second-wave feminism on the experiences of white, middle class, straight women. To that end, we posit a basic distinction between sex and gender, and we examine “gender norms.” Prerequisite: WRR, FYW, or its equivalent. (ALS-L)

English 280 B Topic: Muslim Women Writers – J Mbele
OLd major Reqs: cross cultural, post 1800
New Major Reqs: elective

The Muslim world is perhaps the least understood or most misunderstood part of the world among Americans, who tend to see it as homogeneous, and to whom the very name Muslim conjures up images of religious fanaticism and terrorism. They tend to imagine Muslim women as perpetually veiled or burkaclad, suffering in silence under archaic religious and cultural traditions. That there is a longstanding tradition of writing by Muslim women in languages such as Urdu, Arabic, Turkish, Hausa, Swahili, French and English is not well known among Americans.

This course will explore the prevailing misconceptions. With a focus on writings in English and some translations, we will discuss writers from Bangladesh, Pakistan, Egypt, Sudan, Senegal, and the USA, in the context of Islam, Orientalism, Islamophobia, and Islamic feminism. It will illuminate the ways Muslim women writers imagine and interpret their condition within the framework of culture, religion, and gender. Prerequisite: WRR, FYW, or its equivalent. (ALS-L)

English 280 C Topic: Playwriting – O Safdie
OLd major Reqs: genre
New Major Reqs: elective

In this course students read contemporary plays and write intensively, exploring the writer’s craft. Students peer-edit each others’ writing. Prerequisite: FYW, WRR, or equivalent.

English 280 D Topic: Personal Narrative – O Safdie
OLd major Reqs: genre
New Major Reqs: elective

In this course students read contemporary personal narratives and write intensively, exploring the writer’s craft. Students peer-edit each others’ writing. Prerequisite: FYW, WRR, or equivalent.

English 282 Fantasy and Science Fiction – C Bucciaglia
OLd major Reqs: genre, Post 1800
New Major Reqs: elective

In this course students read, analyze, and write works of speculative fiction (including genres such as fantasy, science fiction, magical realism, and fabulism). Readings include short stories and novels that exemplify these genres by writers such as Ursula Le Guin, Octavia Butler, and Gabrial Garcia Márquez. Students then apply their knowledge of form, theme, content, and narrative techniques by crafting and workshopping their own stories. Prerequisite: FYW, WRR, or equivalent. GE: WRI. OLE Core: CRE, WAC.

English 285 Digital Rhetoric and New Media Literacy  – R Eichberger
OLd major Reqs: genre, post 1800
New Major Reqs: elective

Students explore what it means to be literate in an age of new media by reading critical scholarship and comparing the ways they read, interpret, and learn from digital texts to ways they read, interpret, and learn from print media. In their final, digital project, students critically examine the use of new media to make humanities scholarship more public. Offered periodically. Also counts toward media studies concentration. Prerequisite: WRR, FYW, or its equivalent. GE: WRI. OLE Core: WAC.

English 293 Fiction Writing – K Schwehn
OLd major Reqs: genre, post 1800
New Major Reqs: elective

In this course students read and analyze contemporary fiction from an artistic perspective and write intensively, exploring the writer’s craft. Students compose multiple pieces of original fiction and peer-edit each others’ writing. English 150 can be helpful but is not required. Prerequisites: FYW and at least sophomore status. GE: WRI. OLE Core: CRE, WAC.

English 296 Screenwriting – O Safdie
OLd major Reqs: genre
New Major Reqs: elective

Students learn the techniques of screenwriting, including how to write a treatment, to create backstories, and to break down scenes. Each student produces and revises a narrative screenplay. Also counts toward film studies and media studies concentrations. Prerequisites: FYW and at least sophomore status. GE: WRI. OLE Core: WAC.

300-level (Level III)

English 360 Literary Criticism/Theory – J Naito
OLd major Reqs: 300-level (literary studies)
New Major Reqs: 300-level (literary studies) OR antiracism requirement

This course will provide an introduction to major topics in modern and contemporary literary theory and criticism. The works on the syllabus have been arranged so as to trace out the development of specific, though often intersecting lines of inquiry: aesthetic and formalist approaches to literature; structuralism, poststructuralism, and deconstruction; Marxist and materialist theory; psychoanalytic and feminist theory; postcolonial theory; queer theory; and several examples of influential theory from the opening decades of the twenty-first century. The bulk of our time will be spent reading and discussing works of theory, but you will also develop a better understanding of its application through assignments and in-class activities. Prerequisites: English 185 and at least two level-II English courses or by permission of instructor.

English 371 Advanced Poetry Writing – D LeBlanc
OLd major Reqs: 300-level (creative writing workshop)
New Major Reqs: 300-level (creative writing workshop)

Students focus on poetry, deepening their understanding of the form and completing a substantial portfolio of polished work. Class sessions include discussion of models in contemporary poetry, exploration of various options within the form, and workshopping of student writing. Prerequisites: ENGL 292 or permission of the instructor. GE: WRI.

English 395 Chaucer and Ethics – K Cherewatuk
OLd major Reqs: 300-level (literary studies)
New Major Reqs: 300-Level (Literary studies), British literature

Vintner’s son, soldier, courtier, justice of the peace, tax official, amateur philosopher, and poet in his free time, Geoffrey Chaucer stood at the crossroads of the political, religious, and intellectual debates of the late Middle Ages. In this class we examine these cultural concerns as reflected in his greatest works, the Canterbury Tales. As we explore the medieval past, we simultaneously use readings in ethical theory to better understand moral questions, Chaucer’s poetry, and ourselves–as interpreters of literature and moral agents. Readings in ethics range from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Kant, Nietzche, Marx, and de Beauvoir. Written and oral assignments are both critical and creative and include a long research essay. GE: EIN. OLE Core: ERC.