Grant Opportunities in the Social Sciences

It’s best to contact St. Olaf staff in the Office of Government, Foundation, and Corporate Relations before contacting funders.

FunderAmountDue DateDescriptionKeywords
ACLS Digital Extension Grants$150,000 FebruaryThis program supports digitally based research projects in all disciplines of the humanities and related social sciences. It is hoped that these grants will help advance the digital transformation of humanities scholarship by extending the reach of existing digital projects to new communities of users.

ACLS Digital Extension Grants will support teams of scholars as they enhance existing digital projects in ways that engage new audiences across a range of academic communities and institutions. To this end, projects supported by these grants may:

Extend existing digital projects and resources with content that adds diversity or interdisciplinary reach;
Develop new systems of making existing digital resources available to broader audiences and/or scholars from diverse institutions;
Foster new team-based work or collaborations that allow scholars from institutions with limited cyberinfrastructure to exploit digital resources
Create new forms and sites for scholarly engagement with the digital humanities. Projects that document and recognize participant engagement are strongly encouraged.
ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowships$60,000 SeptemberACLS Collaborative Research Fellowships for collaborative research in the humanities and related social sciences.

The aim of this fellowship program is to offer small teams of two or more scholars the opportunity to collaborate intensively on a single, substantive project. The fellowship supports projects that produce a tangible research product (such as joint print or web publications) for which two or more collaborators will take credit.

The fellowships are for a total period of up to 24 months, to be initiated between July 1, 2016 and September 1, 2018, and provide up to $60,000 in salary replacement for each collaborator as well as up to $20,000 in collaboration funds (which may be used for such purposes as travel, materials, or research assistance). The amount of the ACLS fellowship for any collaborative project will vary depending on the number of collaborators and the duration of the research leave, but will not exceed $200,000 for any one project. Collaborations need not be interdisciplinary or inter-institutional. Applicants at the same institution, however, must demonstrate why local funding is insufficient to support the project. Collaborations that involve the participation of assistant and associate faculty members are particularly encouraged.
ACLS Fellowships$35,000-$70,000SeptemberThe ultimate goal of the project should be a major piece of scholarly work by the applicant. ACLS does not fund creative work (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translation, or pedagogical projects.

The ACLS Fellowships are intended as salary replacement to help scholars devote six to twelve continuous months to full-time research and writing. ACLS Fellowships are portable and are tenable at the fellow's home institution, abroad, or at another appropriate site for research. (1) An ACLS Fellowship may be held concurrently with other fellowships and grants and any sabbatical pay, up to an amount equal to the candidate's current academic year salary.
Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Program in China Studiesup to $50,000NovemberThe Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Program in China Studies seeks to maintain the vitality of China Studies in North America through fellowships and grants designed primarily for scholars early in their careers. Studies on and in China have developed over the last 30 years in the United States and Canada into a robust field, but current conditions pose daunting problems, especially for scholars just before and just after the dissertation. To address this situation, the program offers three competitions:

Predissertation-Summer Travel Grants, for graduate students who wish to conduct preliminary preparations in China prior to beginning basic research for the dissertation. They are not intended as extensions of the time devoted to basic research but to support the necessary steps to prepare for it. The grants are for graduate students—with a PhD prospectus in hand or developing one—to investigate the research currently underway in Chinese archives and field sites, to establish contact with Chinese scholars, and to secure necessary permissions for their own fieldwork or archival research;

Postdoctoral Fellowships, for scholars who are preparing or augmenting their PhD dissertation research for publication, or who are embarking on new research projects;

Collaborative Reading-Workshop Grants, for scholars of different disciplines to investigate texts that constitute essential points of entry to Chinese periods, traditions, communities, or events in contemporary or historical times.
Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars$75,000 SeptemberThese fellowships support long-term, unusually ambitious projects in the humanities and related social sciences. The ultimate goal of the project should be a major piece of scholarly work by the applicant. ACLS does not fund creative work (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translation, or pedagogical projects.
The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Program in Buddhist StudiesvariesNovemberACLS offers an articulated set of fellowship and grant competitions that will expand the understanding and interpretation of Buddhist thought in scholarship and society, strengthen international networks of Buddhist studies, and increase the visibility of innovative currents in those studies.

Beginning in 2015-16, the Foundation offers two new competitions to support research and teaching. Research fellowships support scholars with a PhD. Applications are welcome from scholars at any stage of their career, from any location in the world.

The competition for new professorships offers seed funding for teaching positions in Buddhist studies. Applications are invited from any institution of higher education and research at any location around the world.

The 2015-16 Research Fellowships and New Professorships in Buddhist Studies compliment the other program components of the Program in Buddhist Studies, strengthening this comprehensive initiative to develop the finest work by scholars in the field.
Berlin Prize Fellowships$5,000/monthMayThe American Academy offers residential fellowships to emerging as well as established scholars, writers, and professionals who wish to engage in independent study in Berlin. Around two dozen Berlin Prizes are conferred annually. Past Berlin Prize recipients have included historians, economists, poets, art historians, journalists, legal scholars, anthropologists, musicologists, public policy experts, and writers, among others. The Academy does not accept project proposals in mathematics and the hard sciences.

In addition to placing a high priority on the independent work of its fellows, the Academy is in a unique position to aid fellows in establishing professional and general networks both in Berlin and beyond. The Academy’s public outreach, which facilitates the introduction of a fellow's work to a wider audience, serves its mission of fostering transatlantic ties through cultural exchange.

Fellowships are typically awarded for an academic semester or, in some cases, for an entire academic year. Only the Bosch Fellowships in Public Policy may be for shorter stays of six to eight weeks. Fellowship benefits include round-trip airfare, housing at the Academy, partial board, and a stipend of $5,000 per month. The Academy’s furnished apartments at the Hans Arnhold Center are suitable for individuals and couples; accommodations are available for families with children at the Hans Arnhold Center or at nearby apartments. All fellows are expected to reside at the Hans Arnhold Center during the entire term of the award.

Fellowships are restricted to candidates based permanently in the US. US citizenship is not required, and American expatriates are not eligible. Candidates in academic disciplines are expected to have completed a doctorate at the time of application. Applicants working in most other fields – such as journalism, law, filmmaking, or public policy – must have equivalent professional degrees. Writers must have published at least one book at the time of application. Although it is helpful to explain how a Berlin residency would contribute to further professional development, candidates need not be working on German topics.
American Academy of Arts and Sciences Visiting Scholars Programup to $60,000October The Academy's Visiting Scholars Program provides residential fellowships for junior faculty members and postdoctoral scholars in the humanities and social sciences. The fellowship program offers scholars a year for research and writing free from teaching and administrative duties, a collaborative work environment, and the opportunity to interact with Academy members. It also creates a national network for these scholars, assisting them in their research and professional development.

The Academy seeks proposals in the humanities and social sciences relating to American history, culture, and public policy from the founding period to the present.
Social Science Research Council (SSRC) Abe FellowshipvariesSeptemberThe Abe Fellowship is designed to encourage international multidisciplinary research on topics of pressing global concern. The program seeks to foster the development of a new generation of researchers who are interested in policy-relevant topics of long-range importance and who are willing to become key members of a bilateral and global research network built around such topics. It strives especially to promote a new level of intellectual cooperation between the Japanese and American academic and professional communities committed to and trained for advancing global understanding and problem solving.

Research support to individuals is at the core of the Abe Fellowship Program. Applications are welcome from scholars and nonacademic research professionals. The objectives of the program are to foster high quality research in the social sciences and related disciplines, to build new collaborative networks of researchers around the four thematic foci of the program, to bring new data and new data resources to the attention of those researchers, and to obtain from them a commitment to a comparative or transnational line of inquiry.

Successful applicants will be those individuals whose work and interests match these program goals. Abe Fellows are expected to demonstrate a long-term commitment to these goals by participating in program activities over the course of their careers.
Russell Sage Foundation Small Grants Program in Behavioral Economicsup to $7,500OpenThe Russell Sage Behavioral Economics Roundtable supports a small grants research program to support high quality research in behavioral economics and to encourage young investigators to enter this developing field. The program is administered under the auspices of the Behavioral Economics Roundtable, a group of researchers in behavioral economics formed by the Russell Sage Foundation to encourage interdisciplinary research in behavioral economics.

There are no limitations on the disciplinary background of the principal investigator, and the proposed research may address any topic in behavioral economics. However, projects must contribute to the Foundation's mission to improve the social and living conditions in the U.S. Appropriate projects will demonstrate explicit use of psychological concepts in the motivation of the research design and the preparation of the results. Experimental projects which do not have substantial behavioral content (such as market experiments testing neoclassical ideas) or substantial economic content (such as psychology experiments with no economic choices or strategic or market implications) will not be funded.

There is a $7,500 lifetime limit for these small grants.
Russell Sage Foundation Visiting Scholarsup to $110,000SeptemberThe Russell Sage Foundation's Visiting Scholars Program provides a unique opportunity for select scholars in the social, economic and behavioral sciences to pursue their research and writing while in residence at the Foundation’s New York headquarters. Research carried out by Visiting Scholars constitutes an important part of the Foundation’s ongoing effort to analyze and understand the complex and shifting nature of social and economic life in the United States. While Visiting Scholars typically work on projects related to the Foundation’s current programs, a few scholars whose research falls outside these areas are occasionally invited as well. Descriptions of our prior visiting scholar classes along with summaries of their projects attest to the diversity of scholars, disciplines and projects selected.

The Foundation annually awards up to 17 residential fellowships to select scholars in the social sciences who are at least several years beyond the Ph.D. Visiting Scholar positions begin September 1st and ordinarily run through June 30th. Scholars are provided with an office at the Foundation, research assistance, computer and library facilities, and supplemental salary support of up to 50 percent of their academic year salary when unavailable from other sources (up to a maximum of $110,000). Scholars who reside outside the greater New York City area are also provided with a partially-subsidized apartment near the Foundation offices. Because this is a residential fellowship that requires significant Foundation resources, scholars are expected to be in residence at the Foundation throughout the scholar year.
American Philosophical Society Fellowships and GrantsvariesvariesIn 2014-2015 the Society awarded over $1.1 million to nearly 200 scholars, and we expect to continue this level of support in 2015–2016. We maintain eight grant or fellowship programs in a wide range of fields. Our Franklin, Lewis and Clark, Lewis and Clark Astrobiology, Library Fellowship, and Phillips programs award small grants ($1,000 to $6,000) for modest research purposes. Our Daland and Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellowship programs award much larger amounts ($40,000 to $60,000) in highly selective competitions.

Awards are made for noncommercial research only. The Society makes no grants for academic study or classroom presentation, for travel to conferences, for non-scholarly projects, for assistance with translation, or for the preparation of materials for use by students. The Society does not pay overhead or indirect costs to any institution or costs of publication, and grant funds are not to be used to pay income tax on the award. The American Philosophical Society is pleased to introduce two new fellowship programs, offered through our Library. Please follow the links for access to further information and application instructions

American Philosophical Society Library Long-Term Pre-Doctoral Fellowships
One-year resident fellowships to assist in the completion of doctoral dissertation research. One fellowship is offered in each of three areas of study:
• Native American and Indigenous Research
• Early American History (to 1840)
• History of Science, Technology and Medicine
For information on all three fellowships:
http://www.amphilsoc.org/library/fellowships/long-term-pre-docs

American Philosophical Society Library Digital Humanities Fellowship
Two-month fellowship, open to scholars who are comfortable creating tools and visualizations, as well as those interested in working collaboratively with the APS technology team.
Open Society Foundations Grants and FellowshipsvariesvariesScholarship Programs

This program works on these topics
Education & Youth
Governance & Accountability
Health
Media & Information
Rights & Justice
This program works in these regions
Africa
Asia
Europe
Latin America & the Caribbean
Middle East

The Open Society Scholarship Programs support individuals passionate about improving their knowledge and their ability to advance positive social change in their home countries.
University-based education will empower these individuals to explore and develop intelligent and humane ideas generated by free and open inquiry, critical analysis, and a nuanced understanding of the complex challenges facing open societies.
Through professional degree and international research awards, we help individuals in constrained environments access academic resources more readily available in open societies. We prioritize grants to individuals in countries particularly challenged by repressive governance and constant threats to human rights.
Using transparent, open and merit-based competitions, we offer awards for advanced study in the social sciences and humanities. Awards include enhancements such as preparatory summer programs, regional conferences, and internship opportunities, all designed to strengthen the networks and communities of the open society leaders we seek to build.
The Scholarship Programs collaborate with universities, private donors, and government agencies around the world, as well as with other Open Society programs and affiliated organizations.

Open Society Fellowship
This program works on these topics
Education & Youth
Governance & Accountability
Health
Media & Information
Rights & Justice
This program works in these regions
Africa
Asia
Europe
Latin America & the Caribbean
Middle East
United States
The Open Society Fellowship was founded in 2008 to support individuals pursuing innovative and unconventional approaches to fundamental open society challenges. The fellowship funds work that will enrich public understanding of those challenges and stimulate far-reaching and probing conversations within the Open Society Foundations and in the world.
A fellowship project might identify a problem that has not previously been recognized, develop new policy ideas to address familiar problems, or offer a new advocacy strategy. Project themes should cut across at least two areas of interest to the Open Society Foundations. Among these are human rights, government transparency, access to information and to justice, and the promotion of civil society and social inclusion.
Fellows are expected to take full advantage of the foundations' expansive reach and work to bring new people and fresh ideas into the organization's ambit. Successful projects should push the boundaries of current thinking and carry lessons that can be applied to a variety of settings. Fellows may produce a variety of work products, including publications such as books, reports, or blogs; innovative public-education projects; or the launch of new campaigns or organizations. They may also engage in activities such as hosting panel discussions, traveling to conferences, participating in policy debates, and aggressively promoting their ideas in public venues.
FINRA Investigator Education FoundationvariesvariesOf particular interest to the Foundation are projects that:

Expand the body of knowledge and/or provide practical materials that will have a positive impact on investor education or protection

Research methods to improve disclosure to investors about investments and financial services

Encourage investors to check the background of financial professionals prior to doing business with them

Empower the nation's young people that are about to enter the workforce to better prepare for retirement and to meet other financial goals

Better prepare older Americans for handling their finances during retirement

Encourage women and minority populations to take control of their financial future through investor education

Advance practice, policy, and thought in the fields of investor education and protection

Types of Projects

The Foundation seeks to fund projects that advance its mission through:

Educational projects or programs. Funding is for programs that respond to an unmet financial education, investor education or investor protection need for a target audience.

Research. Funding is for research that expands the body of knowledge and offers solutions in the field of financial education, investor education and investor protection.

Combination of research and educational program. Funding is for initiatives that lead with a research element and follow with a high-impact financial education, investor education or investor protection project based upon the results of the research.
Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center ResidencyvariesDecember The Bellagio Residency program offers scholars, artists, thought leaders, policymakers and practitioners a serene setting conducive to focused, goal-oriented work and establish new connections with fellow residents, across a stimulating array of disciplines and geographies. Of particular interest are innovative projects that address one or more of the Rockefeller Foundation’s five interconnected issue areas: basic survival safeguards, global health, climate and environment, urbanization, social and economic security.
Library of Congress John W. Kluge Center Fellowships$4,200/monthJuly The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress invites qualified scholars to conduct research at the Kluge Center using the Library of Congress collections and resources for a period of four to eleven months. Established in 2000 through an endowment of $60 million from John W. Kluge, the Center is located in the splendid Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress. The Kluge Center furnishes attractive work and discussion space for Kluge Chair holders, for distinguished visiting scholars, and for post-doctoral Fellows supported by other private foundation gifts. Residents have easy access to the Library's specialized staff and to the intellectual community of Washington.

The Kluge Center especially encourages humanistic and social science research that makes use of the Library's large and varied collections. Interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, or multi-lingual research is particularly welcome. Among the collections available to researchers are the world's largest law library and outstanding multi-lingual collections of books and periodicals. Deep special collections of manuscripts, maps, music, films, recorded sound, prints and photographs are also available. Further information about the Library's collections can be found on the Library's website: http://www.loc.gov/rr/.
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Collaborative Research Grants$25,000-$100,000December The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency created in 1965. It is one of the largest funders of humanities programs in the United States.

Because democracy demands wisdom, NEH serves and strengthens our republic by promoting excellence in the humanities and conveying the lessons of history to all Americans. The Endowment accomplishes this mission by awarding grants for top-rated proposals examined by panels of independent, external reviewers.

NEH grants typically go to cultural institutions, such as museums, archives, libraries, colleges, universities, public television, and radio stations, and to individual scholars. The grants:

strengthen teaching and learning in schools and colleges
facilitate research and original scholarship
provide opportunities for lifelong learning
preserve and provide access to cultural and educational resources
strengthen the institutional base of the humanities
"The term 'humanities' includes, but is not limited to, the study and interpretation of the following: language, both modern and classical; linguistics; literature; history; jurisprudence; philosophy; archaeology; comparative religion; ethics; the history, criticism and theory of the arts; those aspects of social sciences which have humanistic content and employ humanistic methods; and the study and application of the humanities to the human environment with particular attention to reflecting our diverse heritage, traditions, and history and to the relevance of the humanities to the current conditions of national life."
--National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act, 1965, as amended
American Antiquarian Society FellowshipsVariesvariesVisiting fellowships for historical research by creative and performing artists, writers, film makers, journalists, and other persons whose goals are to produce imaginative, non-formulaic works dealing with pre-twentieth-century American history. The American Antiquarian Society offers three broad categories of visiting research fellowships,
with tenures ranging from one to twelve months.

All of the fellowships are designed to enable academic and independent scholars and advanced
graduate students to spend an uninterrupted block of time doing research in the AAS library.

Discussing this work with staff and other readers is a hallmark of an AAS fellowship.
American Association of University Women Postdoctoral Research Leave Fellowships$30,000 November American Postdoctoral Research Leave Fellowships

Postdoctoral Research Leave Fellowships are designed to assist scholars in obtaining tenure and other promotions by enabling them to spend a year pursuing independent research. The primary purpose of the fellowship is to increase the number of women in tenure-track faculty positions and to promote equality for women in higher education. Tenured professors are not eligible.
American Association of University Women Summer/Short-Term Research Publication Grants$6,000 November American Summer/Short-Term Research Publication Grants

Summer/Short-Term Research Publication Grants provide funds for women college and university faculty and independent researchers to prepare research for publication. Time must be available for eight consecutive weeks of final writing and editing in response to issues raised in critical reviews. These grants can be awarded to both tenure-track and part-time faculty, and new and established researchers. The grants are designed to assist the candidate in obtaining tenure and other promotions. Tenured professors are not eligible.
American Councils for International Education Title VIII Research Scholar Programup to $25,000October With funds from the U.S. Department of State (Title VIII), American Councils administers several major grants for independent, overseas policy relevant research in the humanities and social sciences as well as language training. In recent years, American Councils scholars have conducted independent research in Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Ukraine.
American Educational Research Association (AERA) Research Grants$20,000 - $35,000variesAERA invites education-related research proposals using NCES, NSF, and other federal databases. Research Grants are available for faculty at institutions of higher education, postdoctoral researchers, and other doctoral-level scholars. Applications are encouraged from a variety of disciplines, such as but not limited to, education, sociology, economics, psychology, demography, statistics, and psychometrics.

The Governing Board for the AERA Grants Program has established the following four strands of emphasis for proposals. Applicants are encouraged to submit proposals that:

develop or benefit from new quantitative measures or methodological approaches for addressing education issues
include interdisciplinary teams with subject matter expertise, especially when studying science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) learning
analyze TIMSS, PISA, or other international data resources
include the integration and analysis of more than one data set

Research projects related to at least one of the strands above and to science and/or mathematics education are especially encouraged. Other topics of interest include policies and practices related to student achievement in STEM, contextual factors in education, educational participation and persistence (kindergarten through graduate school), early childhood education, and postsecondary education. The research project must include the analysis of data from at least one of the large-scale, nationally or internationally representative data sets supported by NCES, NSF, or other federal agency, such as the U.S. Department of Labor, the U.S. Census Bureau, and the National Institutes of Health. The data set(s) of interest must be available for analysis at the time of application (public- or restricted-use files are permissible). Additional data sets may be used in conjunction with the obligatory federal data set. If international data sets are used, the study must include U.S. education.
American Institute for Economic Research Visiting Research Fellowship (summer)variesMarch The American Institute for Economic Research (AIER) helps individuals take action to improve their economic and financial well-being by providing factual, unbiased research and analysis.

We strive to be a trusted source for economic information that serves people. Broadly speaking, we produce two types of economic material.

First, we study and report on basic information that allows people to understand large economic forces and their consequences. We are interested in understanding, for example, how the overall economy is affecting employment, production, productivity, trade, investments, and inflation. Having this background knowledge helps people generally understand the world around them. But, the macro focus of our work also allows people to more fully understand many public issues that are of concern to citizens Among our research interests in this vein are monetary and fiscal policies, the degree to which the U.S. economy is internationally competitive, and whether the country is making the infrastructure investment decisions that will keep the U.S. economy strong into the next generation. This list of research topics is suggestive, not exhaustive. However, they hold in common an applied, rather than theoretical perspective.

Second, we have a focus on individuals, households, and businesses. That is, we believe that in addition to a foundational understanding of the economy, people need economic information in order to make better decisions as consumers, small business owners, workers, independent investors, parents, and citizens. This is particularly important when those decisions are high-impact/low-frequency. High-impact/low-frequency decisions are those that individuals do not make often, such as home purchases, investments in career and education, decisions regarding starting one’s own business, or saving for retirement and managing those assets. Despite these being decisions that people make infrequently, they have the potential to have a high impact on the quality of life for individuals and their families.

We are now looking for social science researchers trained in economics and allied disciplines. Our general areas of research interest are:

behavioral economics,
business cycles,
technology and innovation,
regional economics,
small business economics.

As a Visiting Research Fellow (VRF) you are required to contribute to this research agenda. The research questions that you pose would be expected to yield results that are of practical significance and use to ordinary people.

In particular, within the above mentioned fields, we are interested in research in the following areas:

Macroeconomics: business cycles, industrial competitiveness, or technology and innovation.
Personal-finance and behavioral economics.
Housing finance.
Education and careers: decision-making at the household level. For example, research regarding the inputs to decision-making regarding career choice, career development, investments in education, and training.
Small-business economics: start-up decision, an evaluation of alternative investments, collaborative and cooperative arrangements for reducing small business costs, and the uses of credit and debt.

These questions are intended to suggest the Department’s areas of interest, and to provide candidates with clear and specific examples of what we mean by the research areas of interest and the types of research results we are interested in. That is, this is not an exhaustive list. We are interested in all creative and clearly articulated research proposals that advance this research agenda.
American Political Science Association Congressional Fellowship Program $38,000 December The American Political Science Association's Congressional Fellowship Program is a highly selective, nonpartisan program devoted to expanding knowledge and awareness of Congress. Since 1953, it has brought select political scientists, journalists, federal employees, health policy specialists, and international scholars to Capitol Hill to experience Congress at work.

The program lasts nine months, beginning in November and ending in mid-August. Fellows spend the month of November in an intensive orientation where they participate in daily seminars with policy specialists, congressional staffers, scholars, and journalists. After orientation Fellows work on a congressional staff of their choosing.

Through this unique opportunity, the American Political Science Association enhances public understanding of policy-making and improves the quality of scholarship, teaching and reporting on American national politics.
Office of Naval Research Summer Faculty Research Program and Sabbatical Leave Program variesvariesThe Office of Naval Research (ONR) sponsors the Summer Faculty Research Program and the Sabbatical Leave Program for U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents who hold teaching or research appointments at U.S. colleges and universities. These programs provide an opportunity for faculty members to participate in research of mutual interest to the faculty member and professional peers at U.S. Navy Laboratories.

The Summer Faculty Research Program is a 10-week program, beginning in May 2016. There are three levels of appointment: Summer Faculty Fellow, Senior Summer Faculty Fellow, and Distinguished Summer Faculty Fellow. Stipends range from $1,400 to $1,900 per week for the summer program. Each fellow will be reimbursed for expenses incurred on an optional pre-program visit to the sponsoring laboratory and one round-trip encompassing travel to the sponsoring laboratory at the beginning of the program and travel back to their home residence at the end of the program. Relocation assistance is also provided to qualifying participants. At the discretion of the Navy lab, fellows may be allowed to bring a student (undergraduate or graduate) to the lab to assist with the summer research.

The Sabbatical Leave Program provides fellowship appointments for a minimum of one semester to a maximum of one year in length. Participants in the Sabbatical Leave Program receive a monthly stipend making up the difference between salary and sabbatical leave pay from their home institution. Relocation and travel assistance are provided to qualifying participants.

Both programs are residential and all work must be completed on site at the sponsoring U.S. Navy Laboratory.
American Sociological Association Carla B. Howrey Teaching Enhancement Grants $2,000 February The Carla B. Howery Teaching Enhancement Grant program supports teaching projects that advance the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) within the discipline of sociology. The Carnegie Foundation has defined SoTL as “problem posing about an issue of teaching or learning, study of the problem through methods appropriate to the disciplinary epistemologies, applications of results to practice, communication of results, self-reflection, and peer review” (Cambridge, 2001).

Award

Howery Teaching Grants can support an individual, a program, a department, or a committee of a state/regional association. ASA may award multiple grants, each up to $2,500. Funds can be used for a variety of purposes including, but not limited to: summer salary, equipment, software, travel, meetings, transcription of interviews and survey implementation. Principal criteria for the award are: the project advances the teaching and learning of sociology, serves as a seed project that will continue to have an impact over time, and will be systemic in its impact. The criteria are intentionally flexible in order to accommodate innovative proposals.
American Sociological Association Community Action Research Initiative (CARI) Grant $1,000 - $3,000FebruaryProgram Description
To encourage sociologists to undertake community action projects that bring social science knowledge, methods, and expertise to bear in addressing community-identified issues and concerns. Grant applications are encouraged from sociologists seeking to work with community organizations, local public interest groups, or community action projects. Appointments will run for the duration of the project, whether the activity is to be undertaken during the year, in the summer, or for other time-spans.
Project Ideas
Sociologists are expected to work in relevant community organizations. The proposed work can include such activities as needs assessments, empirical research relevant to community activities or action planning, the design and/or implementation of evaluation studies, or analytic review of the social science literature related to a policy issue or problem. Innovative placements and plans are encouraged. They may also be called upon by ASA to participate in press briefings, testimony, or other presentations related to the subject area of the fellowship. Standard research projects, however interesting, are not appropriate for this funding. The goal of this program is to link sociologists with community action groups and to use sociological research to advance the goals of those groups.
Calvin K. Kazanjian Economics Foundation Grants$3,500 - $150,000 (av. $22,000)FebruaryThe foundation maintains a vital interest in the overall efforts to increase economic literacy, including the application of new strategies for teaching economics including on-line and web-based instruction, projects, policy studies, or programs that encourage measurement of economic understanding, and programs that help otherwise disenfranchised youth and/or young adults with children learn to participate in the economic system. The Foundation will look most favorably at programs that match grants of support with funds from other organizations, learned institutions, universities, colleges, and government sources.
Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange Research GrantsvariesOctoberBASIC REQUIREMENTS
Scholars at academic institutions are eligible to apply for research grants. Researchers focusing on the social, cultural, economic or political development of Taiwan over the past few decades are especially encouraged to apply. Priority will be given to collaborative projects with scholars in Taiwan. Research grants are usually given for no more than two years.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
1. The Foundation's grants provide support for research on Chinese Studies in the humanities and social sciences.
2. Funding is not provided for capital equipment (including computers and printers), building design, construction, or maintenance.
3. Funding is not available for university administrative costs including overhead or endowments.
4. The Foundation does not subsidize administrative expenses or the purchase of equipment.
5. Foundation funds can only be transferred to and managed by institutional accounts. Letters of support from the applicant's institution must express the institution's willingness to comply with these procedures.
6. With the exception of Senior Scholar Grants, the Foundation does not supply funding for the salaries for project directors or co-directors.
7. The Foundation does not fund library acquisitions.
8. An applicant who already has a two-year research grant is not eligible to apply for a CCK Grant for Scholars that would run concurrently with the research grant. The research grant must end before an applicant can apply for a CCK Grant for Scholars.
9. The Foundation encourages applications with matching funds from other sources.
10. The Foundation reserves the right to post project abstracts and reports on its websites.
Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange Scholar Grants (Non-Residential Sabbatical)$35,000 - $40,000OctoberBASIC REQUIREMENTS

1. Scholar Grants:

Tenured faculty, including full professors and associate professors, may apply for a CCK Scholar Grant of up to $40,000 or $35,000, respectively, to help replace half of the salary of faculty on sabbatical, or for time off for research and writing. If grants from other sources are also awarded to the applicant, the Foundation’s grant, when added to the others, should not exceed the recipient’s annual salary. Applications should be accompanied by a letter of support from the chairman of the department, from the dean of the college or the provost of the university.

2. Junior Scholar Grants:

The Foundation provides grants for time off for research and writing to postdoctoral scholars and assistant professors without tenure who are affiliated with an accredited U.S. university and who have taught for no more than 6 years since receiving their Ph.D. degree. Applicants should include a letter of support from the chairman of their department as part of their application package. These grants will be for one year. The maximum amount of each award is $30,000.
Council for International Exchange of Scholars Fulbright Programs for US ScholarsvariesvariesThe Fulbright Core Scholar Program supports activities and projects that recognize and promote the critical relationship between educational exchange and international understanding, in addition to the intellectual merit of the proposals. Applications with broad multiplier effects are particularly welcome, as are projects that are conducive to candidates’ sharing of their experiences and knowledge with colleagues, students and, ideally, with the general public in their host country and, upon return, in the United States.
Review Criteria

As reviewers take into account the basic objectives of the Fulbright Scholar Program, they apply the following criteria:
Professional Qualifications

Credentials, training and professional standing.
Professional excellence, as evidenced through the quality of publications, grants, fellowships, honors, awards, conference papers, exhibitions, compositions, and performances.
Record of service to the field and the home institution.

Teaching Awards

Match of academic, professional or artistic expertise to the award.
Teaching ability and requisite experience at the postsecondary level, as evidenced by the applicant’s C.V., teaching awards, the quality of submitted syllabi, innovative and effective pedagogical approaches, and/or curriculum projects, and attested to by one of the three letters of reference.
Quality and feasibility of the proposed teaching project: appropriateness of proposed courses to host institution, including demonstrated flexibility in course design to adapt it to the needs of the host student audience; currency in proposed teaching topics; evidence of host institution interest and affiliation, if indicated in the award description.
Outcomes, potential impact and benefits: ability to address the needs and interests of the host institution and host country, and to contribute to curriculum and program development at the host institution, if desired in the award description; benefits to students at home and host institutions; potential for outreach to the public in host and home country, and to establish lasting connections and ties with students, colleagues, and/or institutions in the host country.

Research Awards

Intellectual merits of the proposal: rigor of research design and methodology; originality and conceptual sophistication; project’s significance.
Suitability: relevant and appropriate research experience and expertise to complete the proposed research activity successfully.
Feasibility in terms of resources available and time allocated to the project.
Need for residence in host country to accomplish the project.
Evidence of host institution interest and affiliation, if indicated in the award description.
Outcomes, potential impact and benefits: quality of research output and plans to disseminate research results in the U.S. and abroad; potential to advance knowledge; significance of research to applicant's field and professional development, as well as to the interests and needs of the host country; potential for outreach to the public in host and home country, and to establish lasting connections and ties with collaborators, the wider research community, and/or institutions abroad.

Foreign Language Proficiency

Foreign language proficiency as specified in the award description, or commensurate with the requirements of the proposed project. (Note: in many world areas, English is sufficient for lecturing.)

Previous Fulbright Awards

Compelling justification for a repeat Fulbright grant: evidence of outcomes and sustained professional, institutional, and/or personal ties resulting from previous Fulbright grant; explanation of how subsequent Fulbright grant will build on the previous one.
Where there is competition for grants, preference will be given to candidates who have not had previous Fulbright grants, especially within the past ten years. View the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board’s policies on previous Fulbright Scholar grants here.

Previous Experience Abroad

Preference is generally given to candidates who have not had substantial recent experience abroad in the country to which they are applying (see eligibility). A candidate who has resided abroad for five or more consecutive years in the six-year period preceding the date of application is ineligible for a grant. For the purpose of this section, a candidate who has lived outside the United States for nine months or more during a calendar year is deemed to have resided abroad for that year.
In-country residence at the time of application or a recent extended stay may reduce chances for an award to that country. Duty abroad in the U.S. Armed Forces, however, is not considered disqualifying within the meaning of this section.

Personal Qualities

Ability to serve as a cultural ambassador for the United States, including, but not limited to personal attributes of collegiality, cultural adaptability and sensitivity.

Geographic Distribution

Other factors being equal, and to the extent possible, applicants are chosen to represent a broad geographic distribution, by both home state and type of institution.

Veterans of Military Service

Preference is given to veterans when other factors are equivalent.

- See more at: http://www.cies.org/review-criteria#sthash.LEaSG57X.dpuf
German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Faculty Research Visit Grant & Art Study2,240 Euros (max)May and OctoberDAAD New York is the representative office for North America and we offer a wide range of funding opportunities for students, faculty, administrators, and staff of higher education institutions located in the United States, Canada and their territories.

Our primary goal is to facilitate transatlantic mobility to Germany for US and Canadian scholars, therefore Germany must be a component of your intended academic travel.* Funding is awarded on a competitive basis; we consider the academic merit of the individual, the feasibility and quality of the proposal, and the impact of the applicant and application as a whole.
Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation Research Grants$15,000 - $40,000 per yearAugustThe foundation welcomes proposals from any of the natural and social sciences and the humanities that promise to increase understanding of the causes, manifestations, and control of violence and aggression. Highest priority is given to research that can increase understanding and amelioration of urgent problems of violence and aggression in the modern world.

Questions that interest the foundation concern violence and aggression in relation to social change, intergroup conflict, war, terrorism, crime, and family relationships, among other subjects. Research with no relevance to understanding human problems will not be supported, nor will proposals to investigate urgent social problems where the foundation cannot be assured that useful, sound research can be done. Priority will also be given to areas and methodologies not receiving adequate attention and support from other funding sources.
Institute for New Economic Thinking Research Grants$25,000 - $250,000OctoberOur grant program highlights and promotes critical areas in economic thinking and research to target some of the most challenging areas in economics. Grantees and research teams apply perspectives and insights from around the world, contributing to a growing community of new economic thinkers. Together, we’re creating the fresh body of economic theory and research the world needs.
National Geographic Society National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program$5,000 - $15,000openThe National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program funds projects that require venture capital, supporting exceptional projects while foregoing a time-consuming peer-review process. NGS/Waitt grants are able to fund "proof of concept" research for applicants at an earlier stage in their careers than other NGS grant programs. Special emphasis is placed on expedited grant processing and turnaround. The selection committee endeavors to have funding decisions made within ten weeks of application submission. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

Funding is not restricted to United States citizens. Applicants planning work in foreign countries should include at least one local collaborator as part of their research teams. The selection committee will not consider applications seeking support solely for laboratory work or archival research. While grants are awarded on the basis of scientific merit and exist independent of the National Geographic Society's other divisions, grant recipients are expected to provide National Geographic with rights of first refusal for popular publication of their findings.

This grant program does not pay educational tuition, nor does it offer scholarships or fellowships of any kind.
National Science Foundation (NSF) Interfaces between Computer Scieince and Economics & Social Sciences (ICES)$400,000-$1,000,000November through DecemberThe ubiquity of socio-technical networks has led to new, more intimate ties between fields of computing and economics and social sciences. New kinds of interactions and transactions have been and will continue to be enabled by such networks. Key features of these new transactions include:

parties who may not know or trust each other
parties who may be represented by computational agents
real-time adaptation and decision making by agents, possibly leading to chain reactions.

Designing decision mechanisms that can govern these increasingly important types of transactions in ways that meet criteria such as fairness, revenue maximization, and efficient resource use is a challenge that requires the expertise of both social and economic scientists and computer scientists.

Traditional concerns of computer scientists such as internet traffic, email, the allocation of computing resources to competing processes, and many more may be managed using economic and social choice mechanisms to achieve better utilization and reduction of the nuisance and harm caused by such adversaries as intruders and spammers. Good incentive mechanisms are also needed to mediate the interactions among infrastructure providers, service providers, and clients for computing and communication infrastructure and services. Mechanisms are also important in driving multi-agent software systems towards socially desirable goals. These questions may require a new understanding of simultaneous collaboration and competition among self-interested agents.

Conversely, an algorithmic/computational perspective has the potential to change the types of questions considered by social and economic scientists. For example, Nash and other equilibria lie at the hearts of theories about the behavior of economic agents. Computational concepts can help characterize the range and robustness of possible equilibria and markets for which the computation of equilibria is intractable. Theories of strategic learning by selfish agents, studied both in economics and computer science, can shed light on the dynamics of how agents arrive at equilibria. Theories of the spread of information or gossip in networks can help explain and contain (or propel) the chain reactions that can arise.

Social/behavioral/economic scientists and computer scientists can jointly study the dynamic functioning and evolution of social and economic networks with mutual benefit to both fields of study. The Interface between Computer Science and Economics & Social Sciences (ICES) program seeks innovative research at this interdisciplinary boundary, including both projects that develop or extend algorithmic/computational concepts for economic and social decision problems, and those that develop or extend concepts in economics and other social sciences for improvements in computing and communication systems.

Mathematical rigor will often accompany such research, although well-designed empirical studies and heuristics are also of interest. Understanding the basic principles of evolving socio-economic network models, designing mechanisms for traditional and new markets on such networks, understanding game-theoretic equilibria from a computational point of view, using economic principles to guide the behavior of large computing and communication systems, and understanding the learning and adaptive behavior of human and software agents as well as the dynamics of contagion and similar network processes are some of the main goals of this program. Projects should advance knowledge on both sides of the Interface between Computer Science and Economics & Social Sciences. Projects that use known techniques and results from Computer Science or Economics & Social Sciences to advance only one field (either CS or Econ/SS) are not of interest to the program. Research in Socially Intelligent Computing as defined by the Social-Computational Systems (SoCS) program should be submitted to SoCS; refer to the SoCS program materials for definitions. Illustrative examples of the kinds of research ICES seeks to support can be found at: http://www.nsf.gov/cise/ccf/ices_pgm.jsp

The program hopes to attract proposals from faculty at a broad range of academic institutions, including faculty at minority-serving and predominantly undergraduate institutions. The submission of far-reaching, creative research and education projects is encouraged. Funds will be used to support potentially transformative research with high-impact potential.
National Science Foundation (NSF) Metadata for Long-standing Large-Scale Social Science Surveys  (META-SSS)$500,000-$1,000,000JanuaryThe American National Election Studies (ANES), General Social Survey (GSS) and Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) are long-term survey projects that form key research infrastructure for the social and behavioral sciences. The value of these three projects depends in part on data accessibility and ease of use. These data dissemination activities provide value far beyond the original data collection effort. That value consists of providing access and tools that enable dissemination to a wide range of user communities-- from social scientists to advance knowledge and test theories, to teachers in secondary schools to explain basic statistical and analytic methods, to citizens outside of the higher education and research communities who use the data to generate basic descriptive statistics and graphs.

The ANES is a 60-year time series of survey data collections that began in 1948. The ANES conducts national surveys of the American electorate during election years as well as conducts research and development work through pilot studies. The ANES is considered the 'gold standard' data source for election studies; it sheds light on how American democracy works by exploring the causes and consequences of citizen opinion, vote choices, and electoral outcomes. The GSS has provided data on contemporary American society since 1972, serving as a barometer of social change and trends in attitudes, behaviors, and attributes of the United States adult population. The GSS is a nationally representative personal interview survey of the United States adult population that collects data on a wide range of behavioral items, personal psychological evaluations, and demographic characteristics of respondents and their parents. Lastly, the PSID is a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample of US families that began in 1968. The PSID is the world's longest running nationally representative panel survey. With over forty years of data on the same families and their descendents, the PSID is considered a cornerstone of the data infrastructure for empirically-based social science research in the US and the world.

Over the course of the extensive survey cycles the three survey projects have accumulated important metadata, or "data about data" including technical reports, survey instruments and other information that describe the survey process. These metadata exist in many different formats (text and non-text-based) and have been stored in different ways depending on the date of the original data collection, the available technologies at that date (paper, scanned into PDF, and other formats), and access to storage facilities. Currently, these metadata are not in a format that allows for easy analysis within any one survey and the surveys do not have common data formats that would enable analysis of data across surveys. The lack of metadata limits the usefulness of the legacy data from early survey waves. Researchers interested in using the data under current conditions must invest significant time and effort to understand the data structure. This limits the ability of interdisciplinary scientists to analyze data from two or more of the surveys. And finally it limits the availability of the survey results from all three surveys to the broad public that is interested in questions about democracy, family well being, and social attitudes.
This solicitation seeks proposals that will develop tools to bridge data collection and dissemination by first, collecting and coding metadata associated with future waves of the ANES, GSS, and PSID surveys as collection and processing techniques evolve; and second, migrating (or "retrofitting") metadata associated with earlier (i.e., legacy) waves of these surveys into formats and schema that are compatible with current and future collection efforts. The goal is to fund projects that will help make the many years of legacy data available to researchers who seek to answer current scientific questions.
National Science Foundation (NSF) Cultural Anthropology - Senior Research ProgramUp to $100,000 per yearJanuary and August The primary objective of the Cultural Anthropology Program is to support basic scientific research on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability. Anthropological research spans a wide gamut, and contemporary cultural anthropology is an arena in which diverse research traditions and methodologies are valid. Recognizing the breadth of the field’s contributions to science, the Cultural Anthropology Program welcomes proposals for empirically grounded, theoretically engaged, and methodologically sophisticated research in all sub-fields of cultural anthropology. Because the National Science Foundation’s mandate is to support basic research, the NSF Cultural Anthropology Program does not fund research that takes as its primary goal improved clinical practice or applied policy. Program research priorities include, but are not limited to, research that increases our understanding of:

Socio-cultural drivers of critical anthropogenic processes such as deforestation, desertification, land cover change, urbanization, and poverty
Resilience and robustness of socio-cultural systems
Conflict, cooperation, and altruism
Economy, culture, migration, and globalization
Variability and change in kinship and family norms and practices
Cultural and social contexts of health and disease
Social regulation, governmentality, and violence
Origins of complexity in socio-cultural systems
Language and culture: orality and literacy, sociolinguistics, and cognition
Human variation through empirically grounded ethnographic descriptions
Mathematical and computational models of sociocultural systems such as social network analysis, agent-based models, and integration of agent-based models with geographic information systems (GIS)
National Science Foundation (NSF) Cultural Anthropology – Faculty Scholars ProgramUp to $50,000January and AugustThe primary objective of the Cultural Anthropology Program is to support basic scientific research on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability. Anthropological research spans a wide gamut, and contemporary cultural anthropology is an arena in which diverse research traditions and methodologies are valid. Recognizing the breadth of the field’s contributions to science, the Cultural Anthropology Program welcomes proposals for empirically grounded, theoretically engaged, and methodologically sophisticated research in all sub-fields of cultural anthropology. Because the National Science Foundation’s mandate is to support basic research, the NSF Cultural Anthropology Program does not fund research that takes as its primary goal improved clinical practice or applied policy. Program research priorities include, but are not limited to, research that increases our understanding of:

Socio-cultural drivers of critical anthropogenic processes such as deforestation, desertification, land cover change, urbanization, and poverty
Resilience and robustness of socio-cultural systems
Conflict, cooperation, and altruism
Economy, culture, migration, and globalization
Variability and change in kinship and family norms and practices
Cultural and social contexts of health and disease
Social regulation, governmentality, and violence
Origins of complexity in socio-cultural systems
Language and culture: orality and literacy, sociolinguistics, and cognition
Human variation through empirically grounded ethnographic descriptions
Mathematical and computational models of sociocultural systems such as social network analysis, agent-based models, and integration of agent-based models with geographic information systems (GIS)
National Science Foundation (NSF) Decision, Risk Management SciencesvariesJanuary and AugustThe Decision, Risk and Management Sciences program supports scientific research directed at increasing the understanding and effectiveness of decision making by individuals, groups, organizations, and society. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary research, doctoral dissertation research improvement grants (ddrigs), and workshops are funded in the areas of judgment and decision making; decision analysis and decision aids; risk analysis, perception, and communication; societal and public policy decision making; management science and organizational design. The program also supports small grants that are time-critical (Rapid Response Research - RAPID) and small grants that are high-risk and of a potentially transformative nature (EArly-Concept Grants for Exploratory Research - EAGER). For detailed information concerning these two types of grants, please review Chapter II.D of the NSF Grant Proposal Guide.

Funded research must be grounded in theory and generalizable. Purely algorithmic management science proposals should be submitted to the Operations Research Program rather than to DRMS.

General Guidance concerning the DRMS Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants (DDRIGs) funding opportunity includes the following:

To assure that the proposal is appropriate for DRMS, the advisor of the doctoral student is strongly encouraged to contact one of the DRMS Program Directors by e-mail prior to the preparation of the DDRIG proposal.
DRMS DDRIG awards have a recommended maximum duration of 12 months.
The proposal title should start with “Doctoral Dissertation Research in DRMS:”.
On the FastLane Cover Sheet, the advisor should be listed as the Principal Investigator (PI) and the doctoral dissertation student as the Co-PI.
DDRIG awards are designed to cover expenses such as travel to the research site, special equipment, and participation fees.
DRMS does not provide general stipends or cost-of-living support for DDRIG awards.
Your DDRIG proposal's project desciption should be essentially a research design (statement of the research problem, literature review, hypotheses, research site, data to be collected, methods of analysis, and schedule).
The review process for DDRIG proposals may involve only mail reviews, or it may include both mail reviews and assessment by the DRMS advisory panel.

Outstanding DDRIG proposals specify how the knowledge to be created advances our theoretical understanding of the subject.
National Science Foundation (NSF) Developmental and Learning Sciences (DLS)$100,000 per yearJanuary and JulyDLS supports fundamental research that increases our understanding of cognitive, linguistic, social, cultural, and biological processes related to children's and adolescents' development and learning. Research supported by this program will add to our basic knowledge of how people learn and the underlying developmental processes that support learning, social functioning, and productive lives as members of society.

DLS supports research that addresses developmental processes within the domains of cognitive, social, emotional, and motor development using any appropriate populations for the topics of interest including infants, children, adolescents, adults, and non-human animals. The program also supports research investigating factors that impact development change including family, peers, school, community, culture, media, physical, genetic, and epigenetic influences. Additional priorities include research that: incorporates multidisciplinary, multi-method, microgenetic, and longitudinal approaches; develops new methods, models, and theories for studying learning and development; includes participants from a range of ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, and cultures; and integrates different processes (e.g., learning, memory, emotion), levels of analysis (e.g., behavioral, social, neural), and time scales (e.g. infancy, middle childhood, adolescence).

The budgets and durations of supported projects vary widely and are greatly influenced by the nature of the project. Investigators should focus on innovative, potentially transformative research plans and then develop a budget to support those activities, rather than starting with a budget number and working up to that value.

While there are no specific rules about budget limitations, a typical project funded through the DLS program is approximately 3 years in duration with a total cost budget, including both direct and indirect costs, between $100,000 and $200,000 per year. Interested applicants are urged to explore the NSF awards database for the DLS program to review examples of awards that have been made.

The DLS program also accepts proposals for workshops and small conferences. These typically have total cost budgets, including direct and indirect costs, of approximately $35,000.

In addition to consulting the NSF awards database, it is often useful for interested applicants to submit (via email) a summary of no more than one-page so that the Program Officer can advise the investigator on the fit of the project for DLS prior to preparation of a full proposal. New Investigators are encouraged to solicit assistance in the preparation of their project proposals via consultation with senior researchers in their area, pre-submission review by colleagues, and attendance at symposia and events at professional conferences geared towards educating investigators seeking federal funding.
National Science Foundation (NSF) Economics ProgramvariesJanuary and August The Economics program supports research designed to improve the understanding of the processes and institutions of the U.S. economy and of the world system of which it is a part. This program also strengthens both empirical and theoretical economic analysis as well as the methods for rigorous research on economic behavior. It supports research in almost every area of economics, including econometrics, economic history, environmental economics, finance, industrial organization, international economics, labor economics, macroeconomics, mathematical economics, and public finance.

The Economics program welcomes proposals for individual or multi-investigator research projects, doctoral dissertation improvement awards, conferences, workshops, symposia, experimental research, data collection and dissemination, computer equipment and other instrumentation, and research experience for undergraduates. The program places a high priority on interdisciplinary research. Investigators are encouraged to submit proposals of joint interest to the Economics Program and other NSF programs and NSF initiative areas. The program places a high priority on broadening participation and encourages proposals from junior faculty, women, other underrepresented minorities, Research Undergraduate Institutions, and EPSCoR states.

The program also funds conferences and interdisciplinary research that strengthens links among economics and the other social and behavioral sciences as well as mathematics and statistics.

The Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants funding opportunity is designed to improve the quality of dissertation research. DDRIG awards provide funds for items not normally available through the student's university such as enabling doctoral students to undertake significant data-gathering projects and to conduct field research in settings away from their campus. DDRIGs do not provide cost-of-living or other stipends or tuition. Outstanding DDRIG proposals specify how the knowledge to be created advances economics science.
National Science Foundation (NSF) Law and Social Science ProgramvariesJanuary and August The Law and Social Science Program at the National Science Foundation supports social scientific studies of law and law-like systems of rules, institutions, processes, and behaviors. These can include, but are not limited to, research designed to enhance the scientific understanding of the impact of law; human behavior and interactions as these relate to law; the dynamics of legal decision making; and the nature, sources, and consequences of variations and changes in legal institutions. The primary consideration is that the research shows promise of advancing a scientific understanding of law and legal process. Within this framework, the Program has an "open window" for diverse theoretical perspectives, methods and contexts for study. For example, research on social control, crime causation, violence, victimization, legal and social change, patterns of discretion, procedural justice, compliance and deterrence, and regulatory enforcement are among the many areas that have recently received program support. In addition to standard proposals, planning grant proposals, travel support requests to lay the foundation for research, and proposals for improving doctoral dissertation research are welcome.

The Law and Social Science Program continues to solicit proposals that take account of the growing interdependence and interconnections of the world. Thus proposals are welcome that advance fundamental knowledge about legal interactions, processes, relations, and diffusions that extend beyond any single nation as well as about how local and national legal institutions, systems, and cultures affect or are affected by transnational or international phenomena. Thus, proposals may locate the research within a single nation or between or across legal systems or regimes.
National Science Foundation (NSF) Political Science ProgramvariesJanuary and August The Political Science Program supports scientific research that advances knowledge and understanding of citizenship, government, and politics. Research proposals are expected to be theoretically motivated, conceptually precise, methodologically rigorous, and empirically oriented. Substantive areas include, but are not limited to, American government and politics, comparative government and politics, international relations, political behavior, political economy, and political institutions.

In recent years, program awards have supported research projects on bargaining processes; campaigns and elections, electoral choice, and electoral systems; citizen support in emerging and established democracies; democratization, political change, and regime transitions; domestic and international conflict; international political economy; party activism; political psychology and political tolerance. The Program also has supported research experiences for undergraduate students and infrastructural activities, including methodological innovations, in the discipline.
National Science Foundation (NSF) Science, Technology, and Society (STS) ProgramvariesAugust and FebruaryThe Science, Technology, and Society (STS) program supports research that uses historical, philosophical, and social scientific methods to investigate the intellectual, material, and social facets of the scientific, technological, engineering and mathematical (STEM) disciplines. It encompasses a broad spectrum of STS topics including interdisciplinary studies of ethics, equity, governance, and policy issues that are closely related to STEM disciplines, including medical science.

The program’s review process is approximately six months. It includes appraisal of proposals by ad hoc reviewers selected for their expertise and by an advisory panel that meets twice a year. The deadlines for the submission of proposals are February 2nd for proposals to be funded as early as July, and August 3rd for proposals to be funded in or after January. There is one exception: Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant proposals will have only one deadline per year, August 3rd.

The Program encourages potential investigators with questions as to whether their proposal fits the goals of the program to contact one of the program officers.
National Science Foundation (NSF) Sociology Program variesJanuary, February, and AugustThe Sociology Program supports basic research on all forms of human social organization -- societies, institutions, groups and demography -- and processes of individual and institutional change. The Program encourages theoretically focused empirical investigations aimed at improving the explanation of fundamental social processes. Included is research on organizations and organizational behavior, population dynamics, social movements, social groups, labor force participation, stratification and mobility, family, social networks, socialization, gender roles, and the sociology of science and technology. The Program supports both original data collections and secondary data analysis that use the full range of quantitative and qualitative methodological tools. Theoretically grounded projects that offer methodological innovations and improvements for data collection and analysis are also welcomed. Click here for information on Strengthening Qualitative Research through Methodological Innovation and Integration. The Sociology Program also funds doctoral dissertation research to defray direct costs associated with conducting research, for example, dataset acquisition, additional statistical or methodological training, meeting with scholars associated with original datasets, and fieldwork away from the student's home campus. See the Sociology Program Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Awards Solicitation for more information on this opportunity.

Please Note: Principal Investigators should select PD 98-1331 in the program announcement/solicitation block on the proposal Cover Sheet for submission of regular research projects to the Sociology Program and NSF 14-604 for submission of Sociology Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement proposals. Projects are evaluated using the two Foundation-wide criteria, intrinsic merit and broader impacts. In assessing the intrinsic merit of proposed research, four components are key to securing support from the Sociology Program: (1) the issues investigated must be theoretically grounded; (2) the research should be based on empirical observation or be subject to empirical validation or illustration; (3) the research design must be appropriate to the questions asked; and (4) the proposed research must advance our understanding of social processes, structures and methods.

The NSF also offers a number of specialized funding opportunities through its crosscutting and cross-directorate activities; some of the Sociology related opportunities are listed below.

Crosscutting Research & Training Opportunities:

ADVANCE: Increasing the Participation and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers
Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program
Education & Human Resources Program
Graduate Research Fellowship Program
Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) Program
Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Program
SBE Minority Postdoctoral Research Fellowships (MPRF)
Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)
Research at Undergraduate Institutions (RUI)
Science of Learning Centers (SLC)
Science and Technology Centers: Integrative Partnerships
Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Fellowships for Creative Artists, Humanists, and Social Scientists$32,500 - $65,000Fall Women and men at the forefront of the arts, humanities, journalism, sciences, and social science apply to our competitive Fellowship Program to pursue bold ideas, artistic endeavors, or new research. Applicants are from across Harvard University and around the world. Radcliffe Institute fellows receive a stipend of up to $75,000 for one year.
GRAMMY Foundation Scientific Research Projects Grant Program Up to $20,000OctoberWith funding generously provided by The Recording Academy, the GRAMMY Foundation Grant Program awards grants each year to organizations and individuals to support efforts that advance the archiving and preservation of the music and recorded sound heritage of North America, and research projects related to the impact of music on the human condition.
The GRAMMY Foundation Grant Program awards grants to organizations and individuals to support research on the impact of music on the human condition. Examples might include the study of the effects of music on mood, cognition and healing, as well as the medical and occupational well-being of music professionals and the creative process underlying music. Priority is given to projects with strong methodological design as well those addressing an important research question.
Grant funds have been utilized to preserve private collections as well as materials at the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian and numerous colleges and universities. Research projects have studied the links between music and early childhood education, treatments for illnesses and injuries common to musicians, and the impact of music therapy on populations from infants to the elderly. More than $6 million in grants has been awarded to more than 300 recipients.
GRAMMY Foundation Archiving and Preservation Projects$5,000 - $20,000OctoberWith funding generously provided by The Recording Academy, the GRAMMY Foundation Grant Program awards grants each year to organizations and individuals to support efforts that advance the archiving and preservation of the music and recorded sound heritage of North America, and research projects related to the impact of music on the human condition.
The GRAMMY Foundation Grant Program awards grants to organizations and individuals to support efforts that advance the archiving and preservation of the music and recorded sound heritage of the Americas. The Archiving and Preservation area has two funding categories. To determine under which category of preservation grant you should apply, please click here.
Grant funds have been utilized to preserve private collections as well as materials at the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian and numerous colleges and universities. Research projects have studied the links between music and early childhood education, treatments for illnesses and injuries common to musicians, and the impact of music therapy on populations from infants to the elderly. More than $6 million in grants has been awarded to more than 300 recipients.
Smith Richardson Foundation International Security and Foreign Policy Program - Junior Faculty Research Grant Program$60,000 OctoberThe objective of the International Security and Foreign Policy Program is to assist the U.S. policy community in developing effective national security strategies and foreign policies. The Foundation is committed to supporting projects that help the policy community face the fundamental challenge of ensuring the security of the United States, protecting and promoting American interests and values abroad, and enhancing international order.
The events of the past year – political turmoil across the Middle East, increasing tensions in East Asia, and the geopolitical reverberations of the global financial crisis – have demonstrated that the U.S. policy community will continue to face significant challenges in order to protect U.S. security and interests and foster a stable global order. The evolution of politics in key countries of the Middle East, such as Egypt and Turkey, has seen the emergence of groups agitating for more democratic accountability as well as actors arguing for and against a greater role for religion in politics. At the same time, internal events in some countries, such as Syria, threaten to heighten international conflict as regional actors jockey for advantage. In East Asia, territorial disputes and the steady rise of Chinese political, economic, and military power threaten regional stability. Finally, the United States, as well as some of its key allies around the world, are grappling with how to emerge from the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. The downturn has placed significant pressure on public budgets, which is limiting the capacity of these states to promote international security and cooperate on common global concerns, including terrorism, the emerging threat of cyber attacks, and promoting reconstruction and state building in areas of instability.

Against this backdrop, the Foundation is supporting efforts to help U.S. policy makers improve the country’s national security and foreign policy capabilities. The Foundation has developed portfolios of projects on the evolving politics of the Middle East. These have included assessments of the actors shaping the politics of Iran, the future of Turkey’s foreign policy, and the role of security services in Pakistan. The Foundation has expanded its grant making on the internal evolution of major powers in Asia, including China, India, and South Korea, as well as on the prospects for conflict among these countries. In terms of informing the debate over U.S. policy, the Foundation has supported efforts to help security analysts identify ways that the United States can continue to play its essential world role at a time of constrained budgets. Foundation grant making has also sought to highlight the emergence of new challenges, such as cyber attacks, and to consider policy steps to combat those threats.

The Foundation also provides funding to foster the next generation of scholars and analysts and underwrites historical research with implications or lessons for current policy. For more than a decade, the Foundation has provided research grants to junior faculty and junior-level analysts in the think tank community. The Foundation also sponsors the World Politics and Statecraft Fellowship Program, to support doctoral graduate students who are pursuing policy-relevant research projects in their dissertations.
United States Institute of Peace (USIP) Annual Grant Competition$50,000 - $120,000OctoberA flagship from the Institute's earliest days, USIPs Grant Program has supported and furthered the work of individuals and institutions in the United States and around the world to advance the conflict resolution and peacebuilding fields – and to promote peace. The Institute remains committed to the support of peacebuilding researchers and practitioners globally to develop, test, and apply nonviolent approaches to resolving conflict and advancing peace.

Over the past 30 years, the peacebuilding field has matured and consolidated. It now requires a new focused investment in its conceptual and practical development. Accordingly, the Institute has restructured its grantmaking to fund and support targeted opportunities to advance peacebuilding research and practice. The Institute’s Annual Grant Competition (AGC) has been replaced by focused grantmaking to support institutions that test and advance models of peacebuilding practice, and build the capacity of partners in conflict countries to implement and assess the effectiveness of creative peacebuilding strategies.

The Institute has been proud to support the field of peacebuilding in its initial phases and to seed its intellectual development through seminal studies, such Ashutosh Varshney’s Ethnic Conflict and Civil Life: Hindus and Muslims in India; Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela’s A Human Being Died that Night: A South African Woman Confronts the Legacy of Apartheid: and, I. William Zartman and Guy Olivier Faure’s Engaging Extremists: Trade-offs, Timing and Diplomacy. To raise public awareness of conflict and peace-related issues in the U.S. and around the world, USIP has funded documentary films, such as the Emmy-award winning In Rwanda We Say...The Family That Does Not Speak Dies, which explores the Gacaca, a community-based form of participatory justice, and State of Fear, winner of the Henry Hampton Award for Excellence in Film and Digital Media and based on the findings of the Peruvian Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

For information about projects receiving USIP awards through the 2013 Annual Grant Competition, the Institute’s last such competition, see the project descriptions below.

Click here for details about the new grant opportunities now being offered by the Institute – opportunities that reinforce the major threads of USIP’s programmatic work, including the application of new technologies in the service of peace; inclusivity and participation in peace processes; conflict resolution and peace education and training; and the promotion of nonviolent approaches to resolving conflict.
Upjohn Institute for Employment Research Early Career Research Awards (ECRAs, formerly Mini-Grant Program)$5,000 FebruaryThe Upjohn Institute requests proposals for Early Career Research Awards (formerly called Mini-Grants). These grants are intended to provide resources to junior faculty (untenured and within six years of having earned a PhD) to carry out policy-related research on labor market issues. The Institute encourages research proposals on all issues related to labor markets and public workforce policy.

Early Career Research Award recipients are expected to write a research paper based on the funded work and submit the paper for the Institute’s working paper series. The working paper will be included in the Institute's repository—where it will be included among papers authored by a notable cohort of scholars in economics and public policy—and it will be submitted to SSRN and listed with RePEc. We also encourage ECRA authors to submit the paper to a peer-reviewed journal and to prepare a synopsis of the research for possible publication in the Institute’s newsletter, Employment Research.
Wabash Center Project Grants Up to $20,000March and OctoberThe Wabash Center provides funds for activities that enhance teaching and learning in the fields of religion and theology. It seeks to fund projects that promote a sustained conversation about pedagogy through the improvement of practical applications of teaching and learning methods, the encouragement of research and study of pedagogical issues, and the creation of a supportive environment for teaching.

The grant program is concerned primarily with building the capacity of institutions and faculties for sustained pedagogical conversations. It also serves to empower and encourage others to initiate relevant change within their home institutions. In addition, all applications are expected to reference specific classroom practices and challenges.

Grant Levels
Small Project Grants for amounts up to $5,000 (previously the maximum was $2,500) have a short application process and can be approved anytime throughout the year. Rolling Deadline

Large Project Grants for amounts up to $30,000 (previously the maximum was $20,000) require a full application process and are awarded at two different times during the year. Deadlines: March 1 and October 1

Annual Deadlines
• March 1
• October 1
• Small Project Grants (up to $5,000) can be submitted at any time during the year.

Activities Funded
Projects might involve meetings of scholars across schools, regions, denominations, or subject areas to think about syllabi, teaching strategies, student learning styles, or teaching as a vocation. Or they might involve a single department experimenting with creative ways to enhance teaching or a doctoral institution helping their students prepare for teaching careers. We encourage interested applicants to propose creative projects that will enhance their particular teaching and learning contexts.
Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. Research Fellowships Research Fellowships Up to $5,000AugustScholars are invited to apply for the Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. Research Fellowships. The fellowships are administered by the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation from income provided by the Schlesinger Fund.

Schlesinger Fellowships carry a stipend of up to $5,000, which may be awarded to a single individual or divided between two recipients. The fellowships are intended to support scholars in the production of substantial works in either of the following areas: the foreign policy of the Kennedy Presidency, especially in the Western Hemisphere; or the Kennedy Administration's domestic policy, particularly with regard to racial justice or the conservation of natural resources. The successful candidate(s) will develop at least a portion of their original research using archival materials from the Kennedy Library.
Dirksen Congressional Center Research Grant$3,500March The Dirksen Congressional Center invites applications for grants to fund research on congressional leadership and the U.S. Congress. The Center, named for the late Senate Minority Leader Everett M. Dirksen, is a private, nonpartisan, nonprofit research and educational organization devoted to the study of Congress. Since 1978, the Congressional Research Grants program has invested more than $998,026 to support over 451 projects. Applications are accepted at any time, but the deadline is March 1 for the annual selections, which are announced in April.

The Center has allocated $50,000 in 2016 for grants with individual awards capped at $3,500. Stay tuned for news on the application and selection process.

Who is qualified to apply?

The competition is open to individuals with a serious interest in studying Congress. Political scientists, historians, biographers, scholars of public administration or American studies, and journalists are among those eligible. The Center encourages graduate students who have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus to apply and awards a significant portion of the funds for dissertation research. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who reside in the United States.

The grants program does not fund undergraduate or pre-Ph.D. study. Organizations are not eligible. Research teams of two or more individuals are eligible. No institutional overhead or indirect costs may be claimed against a Congressional Research Grant.

What kind of research projects are eligible for consideration?

The Center’s first interest is to fund the study of the leadership in the Congress, both House and Senate. Topics could include external factors shaping the exercise of congressional leadership, institutional conditions affecting it, resources and techniques used by leaders, or the prospects for change or continuity in the patterns of leadership. In addition, The Center invites proposals about congressional procedures, such as committee operation or mechanisms for institutional change, and Congress and the electoral process.

The Center also encourages proposals that link Congress and congressional leadership with the creation, implementation, and oversight of public policy. Proposals must demonstrate that Congress, not the specific policy, is the central research interest.

The Center does NOT require grant recipients to use historical materials in its collections. For persons interested in such research, however, please visit http://www.dirksencenter.org/print_collections_overview.htm for information about our holdings.

The research for which assistance is sought must be original, culminating in new findings or new interpretation, or both. The grants program was developed to support work intended for publication in some form or for application in a teaching or policy-making setting. Research produced by previous grant recipients has resulted in books, papers, articles, course lectures, videotapes, and computer software.

Ford Foundation Fellowship Program$45,000NovemberThrough its Fellowship Programs, the Ford Foundation seeks to increase the diversity of the nation’s college and university faculties by increasing their ethnic and racial diversity, to maximize the educational benefits of diversity, and to increase the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.



Predoctoral, Dissertation, and Postdoctoral fellowships will be awarded in a national competition administered by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on behalf of the Ford Foundation. Prospective applicants should carefully read the eligibility requirements, the Predoctoral, Dissertation, or Postdoctoral Fact Sheets, and the instructions for How to Apply.

Awards will be made for study in research-based Ph.D. or Sc.D. programs; practice oriented degree programs are not eligible for support. In addition to the fellowship award, Ford Fellows are eligible to attend the Conference of Ford Fellows, a unique national conference of a select group of high-achieving scholars committed to diversifying the professoriate and using diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.
Huntington Fellowships$3,000-$50,000NovemberHuntington Fellowships

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage.
Tenure of fellowship: One to five months.
Amount of award: $3,000 per month.
NOTE: The majority of “Huntington Fellowships” will be awarded to scholars working in the general holdings of the Library; however, we do offer a number of specialized fellowships:

Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowships in Renaissance England
Reese Fellowship in American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas
Trent R. Dames Fellowship in the History of Civil Engineering
Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fellowships
Francis J. Weber Research Fellowship in Roman Catholic History
Cheng Fellowship in the History of the Asian American Experience in the U.S.

Applying for one of the specialized fellowships does not disqualify you from being considered for a “Huntington Fellowship.”



Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage. Applicant must be based in the United States.

Tenure of fellowship: One month.
The Huntington offers several travel grants in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong and where the research will be carried out in libraries or archives in Great Britain. We also offer exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, Lincoln, and New Colleges, Oxford; and with Trinity Hall, Cambridge.



Linacre College, Oxford
A stipend of $3,000 is provided by the Huntington to the recipient of the fellowship before traveling to England, along with reimbursement for economy round-trip airfare. Accommodation is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July of 2016; the fellow is responsible for paying for the accommodation. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.



Corpus Christi College/Lincoln College/New College/Trinity Hall
Accommodation and hospitality is provided by the college, although the timing of the fellowship may be subject to the availability of housing options and to the rhythms of the academic year. The Huntington will reimburse the fellow for economy round-trip airfare before going to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.



Travel Grants
Recipients of the travel grants must be conducting research in a library or archive in Great Britain in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong. The Huntington will reimburse the grantee for economy round-trip airfare before the trip. A stipend of $3,000 will be paid after the grantee submits a detailed report on the research conducted. The travel grants can be taken up as early as June 1, 2016, and no later than June 30, 2017.



Clark-Huntington Joint Bibliographical Fellowship
Eligibility: PhD or appropriate research experience.
Tenure of fellowship: Two months (one month at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library; one month at The Huntington).
Amount of award: $5,500.
Sponsored jointly by the Clark and the Huntington Libraries, this two-month fellowship provides support for bibliographical research in early modern British literature and history as well as other areas where the two libraries have common strengths; eligible projects include textual scholarship, analytical/descriptive bibliography, history of printing and/or publishers, and related fields. For details and application instructions regarding this fellowship only, please contact Myrna Ortiz at ortiz@humnet.ucla.edu.
Long-Term Awards

(On your cover sheet, please indicate “Long-Term Award.” Your application will be considered for any of the long-term awards for which you are eligible.)



Barbara Thom Postdoctoral Fellowships
Eligibility: Non-tenured faculty.
Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.
Amount of award: $50,000.
Fellowship is designed to support non-tenured faculty who are revising their dissertation for publication. Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington's collections and must have received their PhD between 2011 and 2013.



Mellon Fellowship
Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2015.
Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.
Amount of award: $50,000.
Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington's collections.



Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship
Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2015.
Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.
Amount of award: $50,000.
Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington's collections.



Molina Fellowship in the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov.15, 2015.
Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.
Amount of award: $50,000.
Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in the history of medicine and related sciences, including public health.



National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships
Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2015, and must be a United States citizen or foreign national with a minimum of three years U.S. residence.
Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.
Amount of award: $50,000 ($4,200 per month from NEH; balance of stipend from Huntington funds)
Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington's collections.
John F. Kennedy Research Fellowships & GrantsvariesvariesThe John F. Kennedy Library Foundation offers competitive research fellowships and grants every year to scholars and students who wish to make use of the archival holdings (including audiovisual materials) of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.

Factors to keep in mind when applying for our research fellowships:

Candidates may apply for only one fellowship in a given year.
The review committee will assess each application with the most relevant fellowship opportunity in mind.
Only complete applications (pdf) will be considered; those received after the deadline will be considered for the next funding cycle.



Marjorie Kovler Research Fellowship

One per year. Stipend of up to $2,500. Preference is given to research on foreign intelligence and the presidency, or a related topic. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. Research Fellowship

Up to two per year. Stipend of up to $5,000 (total). Preference is given to research in either of the following areas: the foreign policy of the Kennedy Presidency, especially in the Western Hemisphere; or the Kennedy Administration's domestic policy, particularly with regard to racial justice or the conservation of natural resources. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Abba P. Schwartz Research Fellowship

One per year. Stipend of up to $3,100. Preference is given to research on immigration, naturalization, or refugee policy. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Theodore C. Sorensen Research Fellowship

One per year. Stipend of up to $3,600. Preference is given to research on domestic policy, political journalism, polling, or press relations. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Ernest Hemingway Research Grants

Multiple per year. Grant of $200 to $1,000 per person. Preference is given to dissertation research in newly-opened or under-utilized portions of the Hemingway Collection. Application deadline: November 2. Award announced: December 14.
Newberry Library FellowshipsvariesNov/DecNewberry fellowships provide support for researchers who wish to use our collection. We promise you intriguing and often rare materials; a lively, interdisciplinary community of researchers; individual consultations on your research with staff curators, librarians, and other scholars; and an array of both scholarly and public programs. The Newberry administers annual competitions for both Long-Term Fellowships of 4 to 12 months and Short-Term Fellowships of 1 to 2 months.

Short-Term Fellowships are primarily intended to assist researchers who need to examine specific items in the Newberry’s collection and are mostly restricted to individuals who live outside the Chicago area. Long-Term Fellowships are generally available without regard to an applicant’s place of residence and are intended to support significant works of scholarship that draw on the strengths of the Newberry’s collection.

The Newberry also offers many special awards and fellowships which carry specific requirements. To learn more about these requirements, please visit How to Apply. Applicants with individual questions regarding eligibility or other matters should read this information carefully before addressing questions to research@newberry.org or (312) 255-3666.
Smithsonian Institute FellowshipsvariesvariesSmithsonian fellowships are awarded competitively to graduate, pre-doctoral, or post-doctoral students – or granted non-competitively to visiting professionals, students, scientists, or scholars – are offered to individuals who design and develop proposals for independent study or collaborative research in fields pursued by and of interest to Smithsonian staff. Smithsonian fellows are generally appointed to terms lasting between 1 to 3 years.

Smithsonian fellowships offer an incredible range of research opportunities. Because experts in the Smithsonian’s various units (Natural History Museum, Smithsonian Libraries, American Art Museum, etc) understands their respective subject areas, collections, and opportunities for research best, the selection process for different fellowships varies.
Woodrow Wilson Internation Center for ScholarsvariesvariesThe Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars welcomes outstanding and award winning scholars, practitioners, journalists and public intellectuals to take part in its non-partisan dialogue. Each year, the Center hosts around 160 scholars who conduct independent research on national and/or international issues addressing key public policy challenges. Through its scholars, the Center enriches crucial policy debates and provides a platform for scholars in the tradition of President Wilson to bring the worlds of policy and ideas together. In addition to its flagship international Fellowship program, the Center also hosts scholars selected through its individual programs.
American Council of Learned Societies Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars$75,000SeptemberACLS invites applications for the Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars, made possible by the generous assistance of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The fellowships are named for the late Frederick Burkhardt, president emeritus of ACLS, whose decades of work on The Correspondence of Charles Darwin constitute a signal example of dedication to a demanding and ambitious scholarly enterprise. These fellowships support long-term, unusually ambitious projects in the humanities and related social sciences. The ultimate goal of the project should be a major piece of scholarly work by the applicant. ACLS does not fund creative work (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translation, or pedagogical projects.

New in the 2015-16 competition, the Burkhardt program has been expanded into two sets of opportunities for recently tenured humanists. The first set of Burkhardt Fellowships continue to support an academic year (nine months) of residence at any one of the 13 participating residential research centers, and are open to faculty at any degree-granting academic institution in the United States. An additional set of Burkhardt Fellowships are designated specifically for liberal arts college faculty and support an academic year of residence at a wider range of locations including campus humanities centers and university academic departments to be proposed by the applicant. (Liberal arts college faculty may apply for either of the Burkhardt awards and should select the fellowship opportunity that will best serve their project.)
The American Political Science Association Small Research Grant$2,500December The APSA Small Research Grant Program supports research in all fields of political science. The intent of these grants is to provide funding opportunities for research conducted by political scientists not employed at PhD-granting departments in the field, or who are in non-tenure track or contingent positions ineligible for departmental funding.

Prior grant recipients published books and book chapters, journal articles, working papers, and conference presentations as the result of the grants. They also report benefits to students, who have served as co-authors or research assistants on the grant-funded projects, and have reported public benefits in the form of briefings, consultancies with government or INGOs as a result of the research project funded. Finally, several recipients were also able to use the APSA grant as seed money to gain additional funding.
A small number of these grants are awarded annually through a peer-review process. Individual grants may not exceed $2,500 and are not renewable.
The American Political Science Association Fund For Latino Scholarship$500June The primary purpose of the Fund for Latino Scholarship is to encourage and support the recruitment, retention and promotion of Latino/a political scientists. A secondary goal is to support research on Latino/a politics.

The fund will award grants to initiatives that: 1) identify promising Latino/a undergraduates and encourage them to enter the profession of political science; 2) provide professional opportunities and financial assistance to Latino/a graduate students in political science programs; 3) support the teaching, research and publishing activities of junior-level, tenure track Latino/a political science faculty; and 4) support activities that advance our knowledge of Latino/a politics.
Brookings Joint Visiting Fellowships (Brookings Doha Center – Qatar University Foreign Policy Program)VariesMarch and July About the Brookings Doha Center

Established in 2007, the Brookings Doha Center (BDC) is an integral part of the Brookings Institution’s (Brooking) Foreign Policy Program. The Center undertakes independent, policy-oriented research on the socioeconomic and geopolitical issues facing the broader Middle East, including relations with the United States. Open to a broad range of views, the BDC is a hub for Brookings scholarship in the region. The Center's research and programming agenda consists of key, mutually enforcing endeavors. These include: convening public policy discussions with political, business, and thought leaders from the region and the United States; hosting fellows to write analysis papers; and engaging the media to broadly share Brookings analysis with the public.

Joint Visiting Fellowship

In 2011 the Brookings Doha Center launched a joint Visiting Fellowship with Qatar University (QU). Over the course of a 4-6 month period, Fellows teach up to two courses at the university and have the opportunity to conduct original research of their own. Fellows are expected to author a policy brief on their area of focus, to be published by Brookings. Candidates with a focus on the Gulf region are particularly encouraged to apply.

BDC-QU Fellows teach a semester-long seminars (16 weeks) at Qatar University on a topic of his/her own choosing. This may be one of the courses currently offered in the QU International Affairs program (History, Political Science, Economics, International Relations, Education, Law), or a related subject as defined by the Visiting Fellow. Courses are typically discussion-based, enabling Fellows to develop and refine their ideas and research in an academic setting.

The Brookings Doha Center’s location in the Gulf allows scholars to conduct field research in the region. The Center’s convening power gives Fellows the opportunity to share views with policy scholars and opinion leaders, academics, diplomats, government officials, and journalists, as well as regional business leaders. The Doha-based international media frequently calls on Fellows to provide commentary and analysis.

Applicants should hold a Ph.D. in a relevant field, with a proven record of publishing and fluency in English.

Timeline and Deadline

The program accepts two Fellows per academic year. Applications are due by March 15 for a Fellowship beginning in the Fall of the same year, and July 15 for a Fellowship beginning in Spring of the following year.

Fellows will receive a competitive grant that will cover the costs of travel to and from Doha, accommodation, and living expenses. An additional fund for further travel and research in the region will also be provided.
Coro Fellows ProgramvariesJanuaryThe Fellows Program in Public Affairs is a nine-month, full-time, post-graduate experiential leadership training program which introduces diverse, intelligent and driven individuals to all aspects of the public affairs arena. Field assignments, site visits, interviews and special individual and group projects prepare Coro Fellows to translate their ideals into action for improving their own communities.

Sixty-eight Fellows are chosen annually each year through a highly competitive selection process for
a nine-month, full-time, post-graduate experiential leadership training program which introduces diverse, intelligent and driven individuals to all aspects of the public affairs arena.

Coro Fellows are diverse, talented individuals committed to positive change in their communities throughout their lives and careers. They are emerging innovators in business, policy and government who demonstrate exceptional leadership through their accomplishments, curiosity and civic involvement.

Fellows are brought together by a common interest in creative leadership and civic engagement, and building strong connections that will support them as they drive impact in their cities and organizations.

Applicants may include individuals who have recently completed their undergraduate or graduate degrees, as well as those with several years of work experience. Competitively selected applicants will join an intimate cohort of 12 participants for the nine-month program, with each cohort encompassing a wide range of communities, interests, ideologies and experiences.

Projects provide Coro Fellows with the opportunity to truly learn by experience. Throughout the nine months, each Fellow participates in a series of full-time projects across a variety of sectors in public affairs, including a final independent project of the Fellow’s choosing. Sectors may include:
Government | Business | Electoral Politics | Organized Labor | Media | Non-profit/Philanthropy

These diverse projects aim to both complement and challenge the Fellow’s experiences and interests. The high level of access available to Fellows in each of their projects ensures a remarkable behind-the-scenes view of each organization and necessitates complete confidentiality. Elected officials, staffers, department heads, executive directors, and CEO’s provide the knowledge and perspective to help Fellows assess how organizations get things done in the social, political, and economic spheres.For the final independent project, Fellows are allowed to choose and develop their own individual project in cooperation with an agency. This process allows Fellows to explore an area of interest while developing negotiating skills.
Dirksen Congressional Center Congressional Research Grants$3,500March The Dirksen Congressional Center invites applications for grants to fund research on congressional leadership and the U.S. Congress. The Center, named for the late Senate Minority Leader Everett M. Dirksen, is a private, nonpartisan, nonprofit research and educational organization devoted to the study of Congress. Since 1978, the Congressional Research Grants program has invested more than $998,026 to support over 451 projects. Applications are accepted at any time, but the deadline is March 1 for the annual selections, which are announced in April.

The Center has allocated $50,000 in 2016 for grants with individual awards capped at $3,500. Stay tuned for news on the application and selection process.

Who is qualified to apply?

The competition is open to individuals with a serious interest in studying Congress. Political scientists, historians, biographers, scholars of public administration or American studies, and journalists are among those eligible. The Center encourages graduate students who have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus to apply and awards a significant portion of the funds for dissertation research. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who reside in the United States.

The grants program does not fund undergraduate or pre-Ph.D. study. Organizations are not eligible. Research teams of two or more individuals are eligible. No institutional overhead or indirect costs may be claimed against a Congressional Research Grant.

What kind of research projects are eligible for consideration?

The Center’s first interest is to fund the study of the leadership in the Congress, both House and Senate. Topics could include external factors shaping the exercise of congressional leadership, institutional conditions affecting it, resources and techniques used by leaders, or the prospects for change or continuity in the patterns of leadership. In addition, The Center invites proposals about congressional procedures, such as committee operation or mechanisms for institutional change, and Congress and the electoral process.

The Center also encourages proposals that link Congress and congressional leadership with the creation, implementation, and oversight of public policy. Proposals must demonstrate that Congress, not the specific policy, is the central research interest.

The Center does NOT require grant recipients to use historical materials in its collections. For persons interested in such research, however, please visit http://www.dirksencenter.org/print_collections_overview.htm for information about our holdings.

The research for which assistance is sought must be original, culminating in new findings or new interpretation, or both. The grants program was developed to support work intended for publication in some form or for application in a teaching or policy-making setting. Research produced by previous grant recipients has resulted in books, papers, articles, course lectures, videotapes, and computer software.

What could a Congressional Research Grant pay for?

Generally speaking, a grant can cover almost any aspect of a qualified research project, such as travel to conduct research, duplication of research material, purchase of data sets, and costs of clerical, secretarial, research, or transcription assistance. This list is merely illustrative. Specifically excluded from funding are the purchase of equipment, tuition support, salary support for the principal investigator(s), indirect costs or institutional overhead, travel to professional meetings, and publication subsidies.
Johnson Presidential Library Middleton Fellowship in Presidential Studies$5,000January and June Lady Bird Johnson created the Harry Middleton fellowship to support scholarly work in Presidential studies and to honor Mr. Middleton’s contributions to the Presidential library system. Harry Middleton was a speechwriter for President Johnson and served as Director of the LBJ Library from 1972 to 2002.

Fellowship recipients must conduct research at the LBJ Library and at least one other facility of the National Archives and Records Administration. Post-doctoral fellows may apply, but preference is given to doctoral students whose dissertation research highlights how history can illuminate current and future policy issues.

The Foundation generally awards two $5,000 fellowships annually. A larger amount may be awarded when special circumstances, such as international travel, warrant it.
Kennedy Library Research Grants and FellowshipsVariesVariesThe John F. Kennedy Library Foundation offers competitive research fellowships and grants every year to scholars and students who wish to make use of the archival holdings (including audiovisual materials) of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.

Factors to keep in mind when applying for our research fellowships:

Candidates may apply for only one fellowship in a given year.
The review committee will assess each application with the most relevant fellowship opportunity in mind.
Only complete applications (pdf) will be considered; those received after the deadline will be considered for the next funding cycle.



Marjorie Kovler Research Fellowship

One per year. Stipend of up to $2,500. Preference is given to research on foreign intelligence and the presidency, or a related topic. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. Research Fellowship

Up to two per year. Stipend of up to $5,000 (total). Preference is given to research in either of the following areas: the foreign policy of the Kennedy Presidency, especially in the Western Hemisphere; or the Kennedy Administration's domestic policy, particularly with regard to racial justice or the conservation of natural resources. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Abba P. Schwartz Research Fellowship

One per year. Stipend of up to $3,100. Preference is given to research on immigration, naturalization, or refugee policy. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Theodore C. Sorensen Research Fellowship

One per year. Stipend of up to $3,600. Preference is given to research on domestic policy, political journalism, polling, or press relations. Application deadline: August 15. Award announced: October 20.



Ernest Hemingway Research Grants

Multiple per year. Grant of $200 to $1,000 per person. Preference is given to dissertation research in newly-opened or under-utilized portions of the Hemingway Collection. Application deadline: November 2. Award announced: December 14.
Miller Center of Public Affairs Fellowships in Contemporary History, Public Policy, and American Politics$22,000FebruaryThe Miller Center Fellowship program funds scholars completing dissertations that employ history to shed light on American politics and public policy, foreign relations and the impact of global affairs on the United States, media and politics, and the role of the presidency in shaping American political development. In academic year 2016-2017 the program will fund up to ten fellowships to support one year of dissertation research and writing. Each fellow, with the exception of the Charles W. McCurdy Legal History Fellow and the Hagley/Miller Center Fellow in Business and Politics, will receive a stipend of $22,000. (The McCurdy Fellow will receive a stipend of $32,000 and the Business and Politics Fellows will receive a stipend of $24,000).

Along with the fellowship grant, the Miller Center assists the fellow in choosing a senior scholar from their field to serve as fellowship "mentor." This mentor will suggest relevant literature to frame the project, read the fellow's work, and give general advice on research. Fellows are also trained in bringing their scholarship to bear on public debates and formally present their scholarly work. Fellows attend the annual spring fellowship conference at the Miller Center which brings the fellows, their mentors, and the Miller Center and U.Va. community together to critique the fellows' dissertation work.
National Endowment for Democracy FellowshipsvariesvariesIn the spirit of international exchange, the Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows Program, based at the International Forum for Democratic Studies, supports democratic activists, scholars, and journalists from around the world to conduct independent research, build individual capacity, and exchange ideas to strengthen democratic development in their countries, regions, or fields of expertise.

The Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows Program hosts democratic activists, scholars, and journalists for five-month fellowships, bringing fresh insights and perspectives to Washington, DC. The fellowship offers an important opportunity to explore new ideas in a comparative context, undertake individual research, and share best practices with one another.
Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR) Prizes and Fellowships$2,000-$5,000OctoberWilliam Appleman Williams Junior Faculty Research Grants

The William Appleman Williams Junior Faculty Research Grants are intended to promote scholarly research in U.S. foreign relations by untenured college and university faculty and others who are within six years of the Ph.D. and who are working as professional historians. Grants are limited to scholars working on the first research monograph. A limited number of grants of varying amounts (generally, up to $2,000) will be awarded annually to help defray the costs of domestic or international travel necessary to conduct research on significant scholarly projects. The award is announced formally at the SHAFR luncheon held during the annual meeting of the American Historical Association. Membership in SHAFR is required.


The Myrna F. Bernath Fellowship

The Myrna F. Bernath Fellowship was established by the Bernath family to promote scholarship in U.S. foreign relations history by women. The Myrna Bernath Fellowship of up to $5,000 is intended to defray the costs of scholarly research by women. It is awarded biannually (in odd years) and announced at the SHAFR luncheon held during the annual meeting of the American Historical Association. Applications are welcomed from women at U.S. universities as well as women abroad who wish to do research in the United States. Preference will be given to graduate students and those within five years of completion of their PhDs. Membership in SHAFR is required.
Foundation for End-of-Life CarevariesvariesThe Foundation for End-of-Life Care, a not-for-profit organization established by Hugh Westbrook and Esther T. Colliflower, was created to improve end-of-life care for individual patients and their families, while supporting fundamental societal change. Hospice care is a very special type of care and philosophy which focuses on the terminally ill patients’ pain and symptoms, while at the same time, attending to their emotional and spiritual needs. It is estimated that less than one fourth of the terminally ill patients who could benefit from hospice ever use it. This lack of access denies patients and their families the medical, social and spiritual support necessary for a quality end of life experience.
The Purpose

shutterstock_160066073The Foundation will provide resources to advance the quality of end-of-life care in several ways:

“Special Needs” Grants for Individual Patients and Families – The Foundation makes grants to fund extraordinary expenses that lie outside the realm of hospice care but are critically important to the comfort or peace of mind of patients and their families.
Research Grants and Partnerships – The Foundation awards grants to fund promising research studies at sites throughout the country, including hospices, teaching hospitals, other providers and academic research centers.
Hospice Grants to Share Best Practices – The Foundation makes grants to hospice providers to facilitate the development and sharing of “best practice” caregiving models and techniques.
Assistance for Hospice Foundation of America Programs – The Foundation assists the Hospice Foundation of America in implementing specific programs, including clergy-to-clergy services, grief counseling activities and the annual National Bereavement Teleconference.
Benton Telecommunications Foundationup to $25,000variesAreas of Interest:

The foundation emphasizes grant making in the following areas:


Healthy Living:

Programs and initiatives which promote an integrated approach to healing and wellness including the mind, body, heart and spirit.

Basic Human Needs and Services:

Programs and initiatives which provide funds and assistance to suffering individuals and families who may need the following due to poverty, illness, sudden loss of property, or the result of a natural or civic disaster.

Food
Shelter
Clothing
Transportation
Healthcare


Educational and Personal Development:

Programs and initiatives for youth and adults leading to personal growth, societal impact and a deeper understanding of the world and its' diverse cultures.

Emphasis on youth leadership and mentoring.


Community Development:

Programs designed to develop and improve communities, with an emphasis on the municipalities located in Benton County, Minnesota.
Types and Amounts of Grants Awarded

Benton Telecommunications Foundation awards grants up to $25,000.
For requests under $2,000 the Small Grant Application is required.
For requests over $2,000 a 50% match and the Full Grant Application is required.
The GriffinHarte Foundationup to $1,000DecemberThe GriffinHarte Foundation is a nonprofit organization whose goal is to promote civil conversations about issues that divide us and are often contentious and difficult to sort through. These issues usually involve questions of fairness, equity, respect, identity (who we are) and the complex ways we are connected to other people. Most importantly, they almost always are related to the very foundations of our lives—so they require that we find ways to communicate effectively about them. Because the founders of the GriffinHarte Foundation, and its members, believe that communication is one of the key elements to understanding and working with our differences, the GriffinHarte Foundation is designed to do the following:

Support and promote conversations, research, and scholarship that are

grounded in questions and practices of civility and feminism;
informed by a desire to define, explore, and advocate for social, political, and economic justice in our professional and personal lives;
centered in an explicit recognition of the ways our lives and communication are influenced by our identities—our gender and sex, race and ethnicity, age and physical abilities, and education and economic standing.

Support and promote educational practices and research that are

focused on how we teach as well as what we teach;
grounded in a commitment to alternative pedagogies and educational practices;
informed by an explicit recognition of the ways identities, genders and sex, feminisms, civility, and civic engagement relate to social, political and economic justice.

Support and promote educational opportunities as they explore identity, gender, feminism, civility, civic engagement and social, political and economic justice.