CILA Faculty Resource Library

The CILA Faculty Resource Library provides books on topics of interest to faculty and academic administrators. All the books listed are available to borrow from the collection in Tomson Hall 283. For most titles, copies are also available in Bridge2.

You can browse and search the spreadsheet of library titles in the window below or in Google Sheets here.

Recent Additions:

Richmond, Boysen, and Gurung. An Evidence-based Guide to College and University Teaching (Routledge, Reprint 2016) What makes a good college teacher? This book provides an evidence- based answer to that question by presenting a set of “model teaching characteristics” that define what makes a good college teacher. Based on six fundamental areas of teaching competency known as Model Teaching Characteristics outlined by The Society for the Teaching of Psychology (STP), this book describes how college faculty from all disciplines and at all levels of experience can use these characteristics to evaluate, guide, and improve their teaching. Evidence based research supports the inclusion of each characteristic, each of which is illustrated through example, to help readers master the skills. Readers learn to evaluate their teaching abilities by providing guidance on what to document and how to accumulate and organize the evidence. Two introductory chapters outline the model teaching characteristics followed by six chapters, each devoted to one of the characteristics: training, instructional methods, course content, assessment, syllabus construction, and student evaluations. (Amazon)

Honeycutt, Barbi. Flipping the College Classroom: Practical Advice from Faculty (Magna Publications Inc, 2016) Flipped instruction definitely has turned higher education on its head. The lectures that used to be the foundation of teaching have been pushed out of the classroom. In their place are activities designed to put the information from those lectures to work. What is driving this transformative shift is its promise. . . . This collection is a comprehensive guide to flipping no matter how much—or how little—experience you have with it. If you are just getting started, you will learn where and how to begin. If you have been at it for a while, you will find new ideas to try and solutions to common challenges. (Amazon)

Lang, James M. Small Teaching: Everyday Lessons from the Science of Learning (Jossey-Bass 2016) Research into how we learn has opened the door for utilizing cognitive theory to facilitate better student learning. But that’s easier said than done. Many books about cognitive theory introduce radical but impractical theories, failing to make the connection to the classroom. In Small Teaching, James Lang presents a strategy for improving student learning with a series of modest but powerful changes that make a big difference—many of which can be put into practice in a single class period. These strategies are designed to bridge the chasm between primary research and the classroom environment in a way that can be implemented by any faculty in any discipline, and even integrated into pre-existing teaching techniques. (Amazon)

Robison, Susan. The Peak Performing Professor: A Practical Guide to Productivity and Happiness (Jossey-Bass 2013) Drawing on research from the fields of neuroscience, faculty development, work productivity, positive psychology, and resilience, The Peak Performing Professor is filled with techniques, strategies, and practical tools for managing the complexities of academic life while maximizing professional potential. This much-needed resource reveals the four skill sets (PACE) that enhance peak performance and shows faculty step-by-step how to: Power their work and lives with purpose and meaning; Align all of their activities with that purpose; Connect with mutually helpful colleagues and intimates; Energize themselves to thrive in this interesting and engaging career. To help develop these essential skills, the book contains exercises that can help faculty hone their abilities to anchor their work, roles, and use of time in their most deeply held values; to integrate their personal and professional lives into a seamless whole; to experience more work-life balance; and, ultimately, to create a legacy of a life well-lived. Administrators will also find the book a useful tool for guiding their faculty to produce, stay engaged, and experience job satisfaction. (Amazon)

Phillips, Susan L. Faculty Mentoring: A Practical Manual for Mentors, Mentees, Administrators, and Faculty Developers (Stylus Publishing 2015) Faculty mentoring programs greatly benefit the institutions that have instituted them, and are effective in attracting and retaining good faculty. Prospective faculty members commonly ask about mentoring at on-campus interviews, and indicate that it is a consideration when choosing a position. Mentoring programs also increase the retention rate of junior faculty, greatly reducing recruitment costs, and particularly help integrate women, minority and international faculty members into the institution, while providing all new hires with an orientation to the culture, mission and identity of the college or university. The book provides step-by-step guidelines for setting up, planning, and facilitating mentoring programs for new faculty members, whether one-on-one, or using a successful group model developed and refined over twenty-five years by the authors. While it offers detailed guidance on instituting such programs at the departmental level, it also makes the case for establishing school or institutional level programs, and delineates the considerable benefits and economies of scale these can achieve. (Amazon)

Sword, Helen. The Writer’s Diet: A Guide to Fit Prose (University of Chicago Press 2016) Helen Sword dispenses with excessive explanations and overwrought analysis. Instead, she offers an easy-to-follow set of writing principles: use active verbs whenever possible; favor concrete language over vague abstractions; avoid long strings of prepositional phrases; employ adjectives and adverbs only when they contribute something new to the meaning of a sentence; and reduce your dependence on four pernicious “waste words”: it, this, that, and there. Sword then shows the rules in action through examples from William Shakespeare, Emily Dickinson, Martin Luther King Jr., John McPhee, A. S. Byatt, Richard Dawkins, Alison Gopnik, and many more. A writing fitness test encourages you to assess your own writing and get immediate advice on addressing problem areas. While The Writer’s Diet is as sleek and concise as the writing ideals contained within, this slim volume packs a powerful punch. (Amazon)

Barkley, Elizabeth. Collaborative Learning Techniques: A Handbook for College Faculty (Jossey-Bass, 2014) Engaging students in active learning is a predominant theme in today’s classrooms. To promote active learning, teachers across the disciplines and in all kinds of colleges are incorporating collaborative learning into their teaching. “Collaborative Learning Techniques” is a scholarly and well-written handbook that guides teachers through all aspects of group work, providing solid information on what to do, how to do it, and why it is important to student learning. Synthesizing the relevant research and good practice literature, the authors present detailed procedures for thirty collaborative learning techniques (CoLTs) and offer practical suggestions on a wide range of topics, including how to form groups, assign roles, build team spirit, solve problems, and evaluate and grade student participation. (Amazon)